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Thread: How a band of marauding goblins gave us E.T.

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    How a band of marauding goblins gave us E.T.

    http://www.cryptopia.us/site/2011/12...ien-encounter/

    Silver Screen Saucers has reported that according to the film’s director, Steven Spielberg, one of the world’s most beloved family films — E.T. The Extraterrestrial — was very nearly a nightmarish horror film based on an actual alien encounter.

    Entertainment Weekly recently published an interview with Spielberg wherein he claimed that the original script for his 1982 classic “E.T. The Extraterrestrial” was actually supposed to be a horror film based on the infamous of assault on a Kentucky farmhouse and its occupants in 1955, by visitors from OUT OF THIS WORLD known as the HOPKINSVILLE GOBLINS. According to Spielberg:

    “IT WAS GOING TO BE CALLED NIGHT SKIES, BASED ON A PIECE OF UFO MYTHOLOGY… WHERE A FARM FAMILY REPORTED LITTLE SPINDLY GREY ALIENS ATTACKING THEIR FARM, EVEN RIDING COWS IN THE FARMYARD. THIS FARM FAMILY BASICALLY HUDDLED TOGETHER FOR SURVIVAL… IT’S A STORY THAT’S WELL-KNOWN IN THE WORLD OF UFOLOGY, AND WE BASED OUR SCRIPT ON THAT STORY.”

    The Kelly-Hopkinsville encounter is regarded as one of the most significant and bizarre UFO cases on record. It is also one of the best-documented.

    Spielberg told Entertainment Weekly that he even went so far as to hire legendary effects designer Rick Baker — of “An American Werewolf in London” fame — to bring the impish Hopkinsville Kentucky aliens to life on the big screen, adding that E.T. only transformed into a family film when Harrison Ford’s then-girlfriend Melissa Mathison came onboard to rewrite the screenplay, transforming it into more family friendly fare:

    “MELISSA DIDN’T WANT TO WRITE IT. I NEEDED HARRISON AND ALL OF US TO TALK HER INTO IT.”

    As much as my 9 year-old self loved E.T., I can only imagine what kind of brilliant alien fright fest Spielberg might have brought to the screen when he was at the height of the fantasy phase of his brilliant career, especially with FX whiz Rick Baker on tap… sigh.


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    Jeeze, I wish he made the other movie....

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    Quote Originally Posted by hyzer View Post
    Jeeze, I wish he made the other movie....
    here is some test footage from it



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    https://www.deviantart.com/ogyunglil...Apes-856673763


    Goblins - Last of Europe's Apes?

    In old traditional Celtic folklore, creatures called 'boggarts' are described as looking like hideous little hairy old men, with super long arms, wrinkled faces, big teeth, and a dim intelligence about equal to a toddler. The same goes for goblins, gryndylows, brownies, and a few other "Underground folk". In even older tales, they were called the ancestral folk, or those who mankind descended from in times long past. Another strange similarity of faerie tales to small apes is how the grindylow is said to have a human or ape-like face, extremely long arms and hands, short bowed out legs, and a penchant for hiding in bogs, swamps, river shrubbery and snatching small creatures with it's hands. This is similar to some monkeys who live that lifestyle in South America today.


    What makes this stranger is that Europe was once filled with giant ostriches, rhinos, mammoths, lions, sabertooth cats, and all kinds of animals to make it a frigid safari. And among that mix were the apes of Europe, known as the Dendropithecines. Europe's apes were around before mankind existed, but they were very much like gibbons, lived on foods that had to be dug out and pulled from the earth, as well as lived by bogs and riverside grasslands. Basically, Europe's homegrown version of baboons and langurs. Paleontological studies say that these apes went extinct long before humans appeared. But many species that should have gone extinct according to the fossil record still live to this day, such as the coelacanth, the six gill shark, the gavial, huitzil and others. So it is very possible for Pliocene animals to survive into historical times. The tale of the thunder bird fits nicely with Argentavis, a giant vulture said to have extinct before humans arrived in North America, and yet it very well may have survived into the 19th century.
    Could medieval Europe's stories of people encountering hairy, short, bow-legged, long armed "men" have been more than just fairy tale? These grass eating, big handed "old men" living in the bogs, burrowing in the earth to eat tubers, and excellent at mimicking humans, sounds so much like gibbons, or apes similar to gibbons. Could these grindylows, boggarts, bugbears, brownies and hobgoblins have actually been real flesh and blood apes? The very last of a ancient line of European apes living since the Miocene period? Certainly, the tales of these goblins' great superhuman strength, fangs, hairy bodies, and always begging for food or being simple-minded mimickers - that sounds so so very much like apes and monkeys living alongside rural country folk.

    Were the goblins and boggarts real? Were they diminutive ancestral spirits, or instead merely primates, and the very last of all the Dendropithecines? Did they learn to mimic humans like parrots do? Was their passion for huddling in human homes and begging for milk just curious apes finding a warm dry place to sleep and loving sweet man-made treats?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Potoooooooo View Post
    https://www.deviantart.com/ogyunglil...Apes-856673763


    Goblins - Last of Europe's Apes?

    In old traditional Celtic folklore, creatures called 'boggarts' are described as looking like hideous little hairy old men, with super long arms, wrinkled faces, big teeth, and a dim intelligence about equal to a toddler. The same goes for goblins, gryndylows, brownies, and a few other "Underground folk". In even older tales, they were called the ancestral folk, or those who mankind descended from in times long past. Another strange similarity of faerie tales to small apes is how the grindylow is said to have a human or ape-like face, extremely long arms and hands, short bowed out legs, and a penchant for hiding in bogs, swamps, river shrubbery and snatching small creatures with it's hands. This is similar to some monkeys who live that lifestyle in South America today.


    What makes this stranger is that Europe was once filled with giant ostriches, rhinos, mammoths, lions, sabertooth cats, and all kinds of animals to make it a frigid safari. And among that mix were the apes of Europe, known as the Dendropithecines. Europe's apes were around before mankind existed, but they were very much like gibbons, lived on foods that had to be dug out and pulled from the earth, as well as lived by bogs and riverside grasslands. Basically, Europe's homegrown version of baboons and langurs. Paleontological studies say that these apes went extinct long before humans appeared. But many species that should have gone extinct according to the fossil record still live to this day, such as the coelacanth, the six gill shark, the gavial, huitzil and others. So it is very possible for Pliocene animals to survive into historical times. The tale of the thunder bird fits nicely with Argentavis, a giant vulture said to have extinct before humans arrived in North America, and yet it very well may have survived into the 19th century.
    Could medieval Europe's stories of people encountering hairy, short, bow-legged, long armed "men" have been more than just fairy tale? These grass eating, big handed "old men" living in the bogs, burrowing in the earth to eat tubers, and excellent at mimicking humans, sounds so much like gibbons, or apes similar to gibbons. Could these grindylows, boggarts, bugbears, brownies and hobgoblins have actually been real flesh and blood apes? The very last of a ancient line of European apes living since the Miocene period? Certainly, the tales of these goblins' great superhuman strength, fangs, hairy bodies, and always begging for food or being simple-minded mimickers - that sounds so so very much like apes and monkeys living alongside rural country folk.

    Were the goblins and boggarts real? Were they diminutive ancestral spirits, or instead merely primates, and the very last of all the Dendropithecines? Did they learn to mimic humans like parrots do? Was their passion for huddling in human homes and begging for milk just curious apes finding a warm dry place to sleep and loving sweet man-made treats?
    I expect this to be much closer to the truth than anything else. I expect some of these legends are older than Europe, though.

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