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Thread: Looking for manipulative hobbies as being shuttered in closes upon us

  1. Top | #11
    Mazzie Daius fromderinside's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angry Floof View Post

    I've been thinking that making dollhouse furniture might be a fun hobby. There's so many different arts that can be used in the process. Tiny beaded lampshades, tiny lace thread afghans, tiny toothpick picture frames, tiny painted popsicle stick tables...

    Not a hobby I can start any time soon, but eventually.
    I've thought about this too. Amazing how atheist minds work. I have a fair amount of balsa and a Dremel tool set around somewhere. Mostly I'm restricted to Lincoln logs since my daughter doesn't want Nico to use them when he's got Legos. Neither them nor an erector set. OK better for me.

    I feel like I should be doing all this stuff. However I think I'll try to be more social in my new hobby. Out here that means either quilting or woodworking. Still .... ....

  2. Top | #12
    Mazzie Daius fromderinside's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Underseer View Post
    I like to kidnap Republican legislators, tie them up, and molest them by jamming Star Wars figurines in their rectums.

    Does this count as a hobby?
    Who cares whether it's legal. Think of it as a virtual hobby. You build a model of your target repbulicasshole and jam the figurines up it's clay arse part. Then you show them of Instagram or Facebook or even Twitter. You don't need to do the electronic stuff actually. I'm thinking the virtual operation would be curative enough.

  3. Top | #13
    Senior Member dendrast's Avatar
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    "Manipulative hobbies"?
    Have you thought of trying to influence an election in another country through social media? That seems pretty manipulative to me.
    Is it stuffy in here, or is it just me?

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    Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
    Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

    A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.

  5. Top | #15
    Content Thief Elixir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malintent View Post
    Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
    Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

    A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.
    How difficult are cars?

  6. Top | #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elixir View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Malintent View Post
    Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
    Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

    A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.
    How difficult are cars?
    Depends... some are "only twice as hard" because you are only dealing with a second pin set. some are nearly impossible without a specially designed tool. And some pop right open using a simple bump key.

    I only pick locks that I own or that I know are owned by the person asking me to pick it, and I wouldn't want to damage my car

    The fun hobby aspect of lock picking is working with "secure" pin tumbler locks. Pin tumblers make up about 80% of all locks.. .and the other 20% use basically the same principle, except without pins. The "secure" aspect of the pins is where the manufacturer specifically designs the shape of the pins such that it challenges the lock picker by giving "false feedback" - like milling a groove into the side of a pin so it catches on the break line, instead of clearing it.. and feels cleared to the inexperienced picker. Without security pins, a lock can be picked in seconds (I am barely intermediate in skill and can open any "smooth" pin tumbler lock in about 5 seconds.... literally 4 or 5 hand movements to pop it open. Once I open a lock once, I can open it repeatedly in about 1 second... not because I am good.. because most locks are just that bad.

    The whole "sport" is very "touchy feely"... its all about feeling the pins and finding the one that is binding the cylinder and then manipulating it with your tool just past the break line... then find the next pin, then the next, then.. POP!

    It is SO satisfying.

    PS - this is a sport, not a practical utility... it is far easier to smash a window, kick down a door, or use large bolt cutters... the whole point of this is non-destructive entry.

  7. Top | #17
    Content Thief Elixir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malintent View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Elixir View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Malintent View Post
    Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
    Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

    A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.
    How difficult are cars?
    Depends... some are "only twice as hard" because you are only dealing with a second pin set. some are nearly impossible without a specially designed tool. And some pop right open using a simple bump key.

    I only pick locks that I own or that I know are owned by the person asking me to pick it, and I wouldn't want to damage my car

    The fun hobby aspect of lock picking is working with "secure" pin tumbler locks. Pin tumblers make up about 80% of all locks.. .and the other 20% use basically the same principle, except without pins. The "secure" aspect of the pins is where the manufacturer specifically designs the shape of the pins such that it challenges the lock picker by giving "false feedback" - like milling a groove into the side of a pin so it catches on the break line, instead of clearing it.. and feels cleared to the inexperienced picker. Without security pins, a lock can be picked in seconds (I am barely intermediate in skill and can open any "smooth" pin tumbler lock in about 5 seconds.... literally 4 or 5 hand movements to pop it open. Once I open a lock once, I can open it repeatedly in about 1 second... not because I am good.. because most locks are just that bad.

    The whole "sport" is very "touchy feely"... its all about feeling the pins and finding the one that is binding the cylinder and then manipulating it with your tool just past the break line... then find the next pin, then the next, then.. POP!

    It is SO satisfying.

    PS - this is a sport, not a practical utility... it is far easier to smash a window, kick down a door, or use large bolt cutters... the whole point of this is non-destructive entry.
    Very cool. And there ARE many situations where a non-destructive entry is a preferred solution. Elsewhere I commented on the obsolescence of manual skillsets, but this one seems relatively exempt.
    I can definitely see its therapeutic value too.

  8. Top | #18
    Veteran Member TV and credit cards's Avatar
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    I've thought about picture framing for later in life. I've gotten pictures framed twice and have muttered expletives under my breath both times at the quote. Could be a nice hobby that might make a bit of money too.

    I've used my Dremel more frequently as time has past. They make a lot of very useful bits for their basic rotary tool. I'm currently using their tungsten bit to shave metal from my bicycle fork to make more space for some wooden bicycle fenders I bought. Woody's, over in Bend makes some nice fenders. That's a good niche to be in. If you want nice fenders for a bicycle, there are no other options I'm aware of.
    Dwight

  9. Top | #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elixir View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Malintent View Post

    Depends... some are "only twice as hard" because you are only dealing with a second pin set. some are nearly impossible without a specially designed tool. And some pop right open using a simple bump key.

    I only pick locks that I own or that I know are owned by the person asking me to pick it, and I wouldn't want to damage my car

    The fun hobby aspect of lock picking is working with "secure" pin tumbler locks. Pin tumblers make up about 80% of all locks.. .and the other 20% use basically the same principle, except without pins. The "secure" aspect of the pins is where the manufacturer specifically designs the shape of the pins such that it challenges the lock picker by giving "false feedback" - like milling a groove into the side of a pin so it catches on the break line, instead of clearing it.. and feels cleared to the inexperienced picker. Without security pins, a lock can be picked in seconds (I am barely intermediate in skill and can open any "smooth" pin tumbler lock in about 5 seconds.... literally 4 or 5 hand movements to pop it open. Once I open a lock once, I can open it repeatedly in about 1 second... not because I am good.. because most locks are just that bad.

    The whole "sport" is very "touchy feely"... its all about feeling the pins and finding the one that is binding the cylinder and then manipulating it with your tool just past the break line... then find the next pin, then the next, then.. POP!

    It is SO satisfying.

    PS - this is a sport, not a practical utility... it is far easier to smash a window, kick down a door, or use large bolt cutters... the whole point of this is non-destructive entry.
    Very cool. And there ARE many situations where a non-destructive entry is a preferred solution. Elsewhere I commented on the obsolescence of manual skillsets, but this one seems relatively exempt.
    I can definitely see its therapeutic value too.
    Ya, I noticed that conversation and see what you mean... no fewer locksmiths out there today than yesterday... more, if anything.
    and with increased technology, come more varied and specialized locksmiths.., in cyber security, the hacker is the picker... which explains why in my field so many people have tinkered with lock picking in their lifetime.

    If you can't pick a lock, you can't design a pick-proof lock. That is one of the reasons that Locksport is supported by the manufacturers... pickers are the white hat hackers of physical security. Manufacturers want to know their flaws so they can design better locks. That is not always the case with software companies... but the philosophy is the same. Fucking Bill Gates set the industry down the wrong path for decades.

  10. Top | #20
    Mazzie Daius fromderinside's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dendrast View Post
    "Manipulative hobbies"?
    Have you thought of trying to influence an election in another country through social media? That seems pretty manipulative to me.
    Don't you know people get correctness police waivers when the turn 75 on most fora.

    It's kind of a nice for a thought task though where one can conceptually waive morality of most any stripe.

    Crazy!

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