Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 36 of 36

Thread: More on the "Big Five" Five-Factor Model of Personality

  1. Top | #31
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Lebanon, OR
    Posts
    6,644
    Archived
    16,829
    Total Posts
    23,473
    Rep Power
    79
    Some researchers think the opposite, that the Big Five ought to be some smaller number:
    • HJ Eysenck's E, N, and Psychoticism -A -C.
    • Peabody's removal of N - rough approximation of the MBTI
    • Digman's Socialization +A +C -N and Self-Actualization +E +O -N
    • Tellegen's Negative Emotionality -A +N

    These are inconsistent, and it looks like all 5 are necessary.

    Observer ratings vs. self-rating? The Big Five appear in both places. An artifact of cognitive biases? Unlikely.

    The authors of this paper don't get into either supertraits or subtraits/facets.

  2. Top | #32
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Lebanon, OR
    Posts
    6,644
    Archived
    16,829
    Total Posts
    23,473
    Rep Power
    79
    Extraversion and introversion
    Extraversion (also spelled as extroversion[1]) is the state of primarily obtaining gratification from outside oneself.[5] Extraverts tend to enjoy human interactions and to be enthusiastic, talkative, assertive, and gregarious. Extraverts are energized and thrive off being around other people. They take pleasure in activities that involve large social gatherings, such as parties, community activities, public demonstrations, and business or political groups. They also tend to work well in groups.[6] An extraverted person is likely to enjoy time spent with people and find less reward in time spent alone. They tend to be energized when around other people, and they are more prone to boredom when they are by themselves.

    Introversion is the state of being predominantly interested in one's own mental self.[5] Introverts are typically perceived as more reserved or reflective.[6] ... Introverts often take pleasure in solitary activities such as reading, writing, or meditating. An introvert is likely to enjoy time spent alone and find less reward in time spent with large groups of people. Introverts are easily overwhelmed by too much stimulation from social gatherings and engagement, introversion having even been defined by some in terms of a preference for a quiet, more minimally stimulating external environment.[8] They prefer to concentrate on a single activity at a time and like to observe situations before they participate, especially observed in developing children and adolescents.[9] They are more analytical before speaking.[10]

    ...
    Extraverts and introverts have a variety of behavioural differences. According to one study, extraverts tend to wear more decorative clothing, whereas introverts prefer practical, comfortable clothes.[34] Extraverts are more likely to prefer more upbeat, conventional, and energetic music than introverts.[35] Personality also influences how people arrange their work areas. In general, extraverts decorate their offices more, keep their doors open, keep extra chairs nearby, and are more likely to put dishes of candy on their desks. These are attempts to invite co-workers and encourage interaction. Introverts, in contrast, decorate less and tend to arrange their workspace to discourage social interaction.[36]
    The halfway state is sometimes called ambiversion.

  3. Top | #33
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Lebanon, OR
    Posts
    6,644
    Archived
    16,829
    Total Posts
    23,473
    Rep Power
    79
    Openness to experience
    Openness involves five facets, or dimensions, including active imagination (fantasy), aesthetic sensitivity, attentiveness to inner feelings, preference for variety, and intellectual curiosity.[3] A great deal of psychometric research has demonstrated that these facets or qualities are significantly correlated.[2] Thus, openness can be viewed as a global personality trait consisting of a set of specific traits, habits, and tendencies that cluster together.

    People who score low on openness are considered to be closed to experience. They tend to be conventional and traditional in their outlook and behavior. They prefer familiar routines to new experiences, and generally have a narrower range of interests. Openness has moderate positive relationships with creativity, intelligence and knowledge. Openness is related to the psychological trait of absorption, and like absorption has a modest relationship to individual differences in hypnotic susceptibility.

    A number of studies have found that openness to experience has two major subcomponents, one related to intellectual dispositions, the other related to the experiential aspects of openness, such as aesthetic appreciation and openness to sensory experiences. These subcomponents have been referred to as intellect and experiencing openness respectively, and have a strong positive correlation (r = .55) with each other.[11]

    According to research by Sam Gosling, it is possible to assess openness by examining people's homes and work spaces. Individuals who are highly open to experience tend to have distinctive and unconventional decorations. They are also likely to have books on a wide variety of topics, a diverse music collection, and works of art on display.[12]
    Openness is also correlated with intelligence, at least the sort that IQ tests measure.

    It also has two main subtraits, one about ideas and one about experience proper. So "openness to experience" only covers part of it, with "openness to ideas" cover the rest. So "openness" is as good a name as any for the whole thing.

  4. Top | #34
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Lebanon, OR
    Posts
    6,644
    Archived
    16,829
    Total Posts
    23,473
    Rep Power
    79
    Conscientiousness
    Conscientiousness is the personality trait of being careful, or diligent. Conscientiousness implies a desire to do a task well, and to take obligations to others seriously. Conscientious people tend to be efficient and organized as opposed to easy-going and disorderly. They exhibit a tendency to show self-discipline, act dutifully, and aim for achievement; they display planned rather than spontaneous behavior; and they are generally dependable. It is manifested in characteristic behaviors such as being neat, and systematic; also including such elements as carefulness, thoroughness, and deliberation (the tendency to think carefully before acting).[1]

    Conscientiousness is one of the five traits of both the Five Factor Model and the HEXACO model of personality and is an aspect of what has traditionally been referred to as having character. Conscientious individuals are generally hard-working, and reliable. They are also likely to be conformists.[2] When taken to an extreme, they may also be "workaholics", perfectionists, and compulsive in their behavior.[3] People who score low on conscientiousness tend to be laid back, less goal-oriented, and less driven by success; they also are more likely to engage in antisocial and criminal behavior.[4]

    ...
    In the NEO framework, Conscientiousness is seen as having six facets: Competence, Order, Dutifulness, Achievement Striving, Self-Discipline, and Deliberation. Other models suggest a smaller set of two "aspects": orderliness and industriousness form an intermediate level of organization, with orderliness associated with the desire to keep things organized and tidy and industriousness being more associated with productivity and work ethic.[7]

    ...
    People who score high on the trait of conscientiousness tend to be more organized and less cluttered in their homes and offices. For example, their books tend to be neatly shelved in alphabetical order, or categorized by topic, rather than scattered around the room. Their clothes tend to be folded and arranged in drawers or closets instead of lying on the floor. The presence of planners and to-do lists are also signs of conscientiousness. Their homes tend to have better lighting than the homes of people who score low on this trait.[16]

    ...
    Conscientiousness is importantly related to successful academic performance in students and workplace performance among managers and workers.[18] Low levels of conscientiousness are strongly associated with procrastination.[19] A considerable amount of research indicates that conscientiousness has a moderate to large positive correlation with performance in the workplace,[20][21] and indeed that after general mental ability is taken into account, the other four of the Big Five personality traits do not aid in predicting career success.[22]:169[irrelevant citation]

    Conscientious employees are generally more reliable, more motivated, and harder working. They also have lower rates of absenteeism and counterproductive work behaviors such as stealing and fighting with other employees.[23]
    A complication in researching this trait is the desirability of many of the features associated with it. That meant that it was originally considered a moral trait, but it is now recognized to be a psychological one.

  5. Top | #35
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Lebanon, OR
    Posts
    6,644
    Archived
    16,829
    Total Posts
    23,473
    Rep Power
    79
    Agreeableness
    Agreeableness is a personality trait manifesting itself in individual behavioral characteristics that are perceived as kind, sympathetic, cooperative, warm, and considerate.[1]

    ...
    People who score high on this dimension are empathetic and altruistic, while a low agreeableness score relates to selfish behavior and a lack of empathy.[3][4] Those who score very low on agreeableness show signs of dark triad behavior such as manipulation and competing with others rather than cooperating.[5]

    Agreeableness is considered to be a superordinate trait, meaning that it is a grouping of personality sub-traits that cluster together statistically. The lower-level traits, or facets, grouped under agreeableness are: trust, straightforwardness, altruism, compliance, modesty, and tender-mindedness.[6]
    The HEXACO model splits Agreeableness, with one part being Honesty-Humility (Straightforwardness and Modesty -- fairness) and the other part being the rest (Trust, Altruism, Compliance, and Tender-Mindedness -- tolerance). HEXACO Agreeableness also includes some subtraits of Neuroticism: (Temperamentalness and Irritability).

  6. Top | #36
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Lebanon, OR
    Posts
    6,644
    Archived
    16,829
    Total Posts
    23,473
    Rep Power
    79
    Neuroticism
    Individuals who score high on neuroticism are more likely than average to be moody and to experience such feelings as anxiety, worry, fear, anger, frustration, envy, jealousy, guilt, depressed mood, and loneliness.[1] People who are neurotic respond worse to stressors and are more likely to interpret ordinary situations as threatening and minor frustrations as hopelessly difficult. They are often self-conscious and shy, and they may have trouble controlling urges and delaying gratification.

    People with high neuroticism indexes are at risk for the development and onset of common mental disorders,[2][3] such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and substance use disorder, symptoms of which had traditionally been called neuroses.[3][4]

    ...
    Individuals who score low in neuroticism tend to be more emotionally stable and less reactive to stress. They tend to be calm, even-tempered, and less likely to feel tense or rattled. Although they are low in negative emotion, they are not necessarily high on positive emotion. Being high in scores of positive emotion is generally an element of the independent trait of extraversion. Neurotic extraverts, for example, would experience high levels of both positive and negative emotional states, a kind of "emotional roller coaster".[7][8]
    Neuroticism may also be called negative emotionality or emotional instability.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 109
    Last Post: 09-24-2018, 11:53 AM
  2. Replies: 45
    Last Post: 11-14-2016, 09:44 PM
  3. FAUX Noise; Mixing Equal Portions Of "Stud" & "Bubblehead"
    By Medicine Man in forum Political Discussions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-13-2016, 08:42 PM
  4. Replies: 26
    Last Post: 12-15-2014, 12:13 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •