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Thread: Base 6 the magic base

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    Mazzie Daius fromderinside's Avatar
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    Whatever happened to CDC anyway. I believe FSU went to some version of VAX in 74-75. Been a long time.

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    Senior Member excreationist's Avatar
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    https://blog.world-mysteries.com/sci...umbers-magick/
    666 and the Magickal Seal of the Sun

    "the Grand Number of the Sun” contains the very sacred number 36 laid out in a 6×6 square with the numbers from 1 to 36 so arranged that they add up the same in all directions, with the total of the whole seal 666.
    So that combines the special numbers 6 and 36 with 666....

    That link also has many other related things

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    Senior Member excreationist's Avatar
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    Apparently Nikola Tesla said: "If you only knew the magnificence of the 3, 6 and 9, then you would have a key to the universe."

    https://blog.world-mysteries.com/sci...-the-universe/



    About the "digital root" (repeatedly summing the digits)

    There are 360 degrees in a circle (base 10)

    3+6+0 = 9

    180 = 1+8+0 = 9

    90 = 9+0 = 9

    45 = 4+5 = 9

    22.5 = 2+2+5 = 9

    11.25 = 1+1+2+5 = 9

    5.625 = 5+6+2+5 = 18 = 1+8 = 9

    2.8125 = 2+8+1+2+5 = 18 = 1+8 = 9

    etc etc

    Angles in a square
    = 90 x 4 = 360 = 3+6+0 = 9

    Angles in a pentagon
    = 108 x 5 = 540 = 5+4+0 = 9

    Angles in a hexagon
    = 120 x 6 = 720 = 7+2+0 = 9

  4. Top | #34
    Senior Member excreationist's Avatar
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    A multiple of 9 (e.g. 360) when doubled, is still a multiple of 9 - so it keeps having a digital root of 9.... I don't understand why this is still the case when it is repeatedly halved, even when it has decimal places.

  5. Top | #35
    Senior Member excreationist's Avatar
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    https://blog.world-mysteries.com/sci...umbers-magick/

    About doubling again:
    1 = 1
    2 = 2
    4 = 4
    8 = 8
    16 = 7
    32 = 5
    64 = 1
    128 = 2
    256 = 4
    512 = 8
    1,024 = 7
    2,048 = 5

    There is a 6 digital root sequence that repeats.... (1,2,4,8,7,5)

    It also happens backwards when you halve it...

    1 = 1
    0.5 = 5
    0.25 = 7
    0.125 = 8
    0.0625 = 13 = 4
    0.03125 = 11 = 2
    0.015625 = 19 = 10 = 1
    0.0078125 = 23 = 5

    https://rense.com/rodinaerodynamics.htm


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    Senior Member excreationist's Avatar
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    https://blog.world-mysteries.com/sci...umbers-magick/

    The Fibonacci series has a pattern that repeats every 24 numbers
    ......
    Applying numeric reduction to the Fibonacci series produces an infinite series of 24 repeating digits:


    1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 4, 3, 7, 1, 8, 9, 8, 8, 7, 6, 4, 1, 5, 6, 2, 8, 1, 9


    If you take the first 12 digits and add them to the second twelve digits and apply numeric reduction to the result, you find that they all have a value of 9.

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    Quote Originally Posted by excreationist View Post
    A multiple of 9 (e.g. 360) when doubled, is still a multiple of 9 - so it keeps having a digital root of 9.... I don't understand why this is still the case when it is repeatedly halved, even when it has decimal places.
    Because 9=10-1, and 10 has 2 as one of its prime factors.

    It really is that simple. 15 in base 16, 59 in base 60, 11 in base 12 or 5 in base 6 al show the same "magic" behaviour.

    The reason it also works for decimals is that 22.5 * 10, 11.25 * 100 are divisible by 9, necessarily so - because heading h is dividing by a prime factor if the base.

  8. Top | #38
    Senior Member excreationist's Avatar
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    @Jokodo:


    Thanks, I'll look into this using base 6....


    instead of 9 I'll use 5 when halving:


    5 = 5
    2.3 = 2+3 = 5
    1.13 = 1+1+3 = 5
    0.343 = 3+4+3 = 14 = 1+4 = 5
    0.1513 = 1+5+1+3 = 14 = 1+4 = 5


    Note I did things like (5/16).toString(6) and (3+4+3).toString(6)


    I think 5 is more of a magic number than 9.... see the pentagram in post 18


    Code:
    function digitRoot(num, base) {
      return ((parseInt(num, base) - 1) % (base - 1)) + 1;
    }

    And now about the Fibonacci sequence:


    0: 1 = 1 [1]
    1: 1 = 1 [1]
    2: 2 = 2 [2]
    3: 3 = 3 [3]
    4: 5 = 5 [5]
    5: 8 = 12 [3]
    6: 13 = 21 [3]
    7: 21 = 33 [1]
    8: 34 = 54 [4]
    9: 55 = 131 [5]
    10: 89 = 225 [4]
    11: 144 = 400 [4]
    12: 233 = 1025 [3]
    13: 377 = 1425 [2]
    14: 610 = 2454 [5]
    15: 987 = 4323 [2]
    16: 1597 = 11221 [2]
    17: 2584 = 15544 [4]
    18: 4181 = 31205 [1]
    19: 6765 = 51153 [5]
    20: 10946 = 122402 [1]
    21: 17711 = 213555 [1]
    22: 28657 = 340401 [2]
    23: 46368 = 554400 [3]
    24: 75025 = 1335201 [5]
    25: 121393 = 2334001 [3]
    26: 196418 = 4113202 [3]
    27: 317811 = 10451203 [1]
    28: 514229 = 15004405 [4]
    29: 832040 = 25500012 [5]
    30: 1346269 = 44504421 [4]


    #0 to #9
    1,1,2,3,5,3,3,1,4,5
    #10 to #19
    4,4,3,2,5,2,2,4,1,5

    that involves a pair of numbers, then two other numbers that add up to 5, then a 5...

    I think base 6 is better since the pattern repeats faster. Note that in base 6, 5+5 = 14 = 5....

    I guess the digital root sum of the digital roots is the same as the digital roots of the regular sum

    doubling:
    1 = 1
    2 = 2
    4 = 4
    8 = 12 = 3
    16 = 24 = 1
    32 = 52 = 2
    64 = 144 = 4
    128 = 332 = 3

    The pattern in base 6:

    Last edited by excreationist; 10-09-2019 at 05:02 AM.

  9. Top | #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by excreationist View Post
    @Jokodo:


    Thanks, I'll look into this using base 6....


    instead of 9 I'll use 5 when halving:


    5 = 5
    2.3 = 2+3 = 5
    1.13 = 1+1+3 = 5
    0.343 = 3+4+3 = 14 = 1+4 = 5
    0.1513 = 1+5+1+3 = 14 = 1+4 = 5


    Note I did things like (5/16).toString(6) and (3+4+3).toString(6)


    I think 5 is more of a magic number than 9.... see the pentagram in post 18


    Code:
    function digitRoot(num, base) {
      return ((parseInt(num, base) - 1) % (base - 1)) + 1;
    }

    And now about the Fibonacci sequence:


    0: 1 = 1 [1]
    1: 1 = 1 [1]
    2: 2 = 2 [2]
    3: 3 = 3 [3]
    4: 5 = 5 [5]
    5: 8 = 12 [3]
    6: 13 = 21 [3]
    7: 21 = 33 [1]
    8: 34 = 54 [4]
    9: 55 = 131 [5]
    10: 89 = 225 [4]
    11: 144 = 400 [4]
    12: 233 = 1025 [3]
    13: 377 = 1425 [2]
    14: 610 = 2454 [5]
    15: 987 = 4323 [2]
    16: 1597 = 11221 [2]
    17: 2584 = 15544 [4]
    18: 4181 = 31205 [1]
    19: 6765 = 51153 [5]
    20: 10946 = 122402 [1]
    21: 17711 = 213555 [1]
    22: 28657 = 340401 [2]
    23: 46368 = 554400 [3]
    24: 75025 = 1335201 [5]
    25: 121393 = 2334001 [3]
    26: 196418 = 4113202 [3]
    27: 317811 = 10451203 [1]
    28: 514229 = 15004405 [4]
    29: 832040 = 25500012 [5]
    30: 1346269 = 44504421 [4]


    #0 to #9
    1,1,2,3,5,3,3,1,4,5
    #10 to #19
    4,4,3,2,5,2,2,4,1,5

    that involves a pair of numbers, then two other numbers that add up to 5, then a 5...

    I think base 6 is better since the pattern repeats faster. Note that in base 6, 5+5 = 14 = 5....

    I guess the digital root sum of the digital roots is the same as the digital roots of the regular sum

    doubling:
    1 = 1
    2 = 2
    4 = 4
    8 = 12 = 3
    16 = 24 = 1
    32 = 52 = 2
    64 = 144 = 4
    128 = 332 = 3

    The pattern in base 6:

    Still not seeing anything magic...

  10. Top | #40
    Senior Member excreationist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jokodo View Post
    Still not seeing anything magic...
    Yeah I changed my mind about that... unless I discover alphanumeric messages in base 36 numbers like the "Magickal Seal of the Sun" magic square....

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