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Thread: Cheese

  1. Top | #11
    Sapere aude Politesse's Avatar
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    For the most part I am a cheese patriot, eating the various cheddars and jacks that my region is best known for, with the occasional derisive comment on the clearly inferior nature of Wisconsin produce. Also very fond of gouda, and the associated cheese curds.

    I love a good wine and cheese spread, though.

  2. Top | #12
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    Crackers and cheese, Tillimook cheddars are nice... but only because I went there. Their sharp cheddars maintain a creaminess to them. Okay, maybe it is just because I was there.

    For mac and cheese, double creme gouda. Found this at a high end grocer in our area that a Whole Foods store managed to evaporate. Samples of cheese were out and this one spoke to me. Perfect mix of tang, nuttiness, and cream for a great adult mac and cheese. Goudas seem to have flavors that range from tasteless to creamy to smoky. This one hits all of the right spots.

    For lasagna, Parrano. I was guessing in a local grocer and picked this up. Turned out to be perfect and try not to make serious lasagnas with anything but. It provides the perfect blend of flavor for lasagnas or other baked pastas.

    For grilled cheese, you need a slice of cheddar, swiss, and Havarti.

    I tried Wensleydale once. [Joe Piscapo]Once![/Joe Piscapo]
    Last edited by Jimmy Higgins; 02-04-2019 at 10:06 PM.

  3. Top | #13
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    Huntsman!!
    That's a full-bodied experience of layered cheese: Double Gloucester + Blue Stilton. Have some good wheat crackers on hand and you're in biz.
    Proving that, despite some odd duck desserts (trifle...) and soda pop (Crikey, it's Lucozade!), the Brits got something right. In fact they got it perfect.

  4. Top | #14
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    Smile

    1. Gorgonzola

    2. Stilton

    3. Roquefort

    4. Pont l'Eveque

    5. Bleu de Bresse for when you cannot find or afford the others which of course should be from the country and region of original manufacture and not copies made in Canada, the US, the UK. Germany, Japan , China, Vietnam. Bangladesh etc etc..


    P.S. I eat a lot of Cracker Barrel and Double Diamond === cannot find Bleu de Bresse.

    Oh yes/ Your favourite red wine with any of these; and a not very expensive Tawny Port with the Stilton is better.

  5. Top | #15
    My Brane Hertz spikepipsqueak's Avatar
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    I could learn to hate all of you people, for I cannot have cheese any more.

    For old times sake.

    Cambanzolo, (which can't be had in Aus. any more because of the bacteriaphobes aforementioned). Or any creamy blue cheese, let's not be too picky.

    Haloumi.

    Any nice sharp cheddar, melted.

    Camembert or Brie with Tawny port and backgammon (the game, not the meat)


    (Goes and slashes wrists, crying)
    My Brane Hertz

  6. Top | #16
    Half Way Between IanSYK's Avatar
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    Though blue cheese on bread and dripping* is not the greatest of tastes.









    * Not a deliberate pairing.

  7. Top | #17
    Formerly Joedad
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    Cheddar - white and sharp. If you can serve it as curds all the better. Gouda is a very close second.

    Honestly, I never met a cheese I didn't like, save for those that have extra ingredients mixed into the cheese. This just ruins the cheese.

    Some of the local shops have these giant cheese things hanging from the ceiling. They're huge, not your tidy little wheels we're used to seeing, they look like hams that weigh a couple hundred pounds. Pure heaven.

  8. Top | #18
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    A good sharp cheddar, tortilla chips, salsa, and beer used to be a favorite meal, emphasis on used to be.

    I eat cheese once in a while. I by a small bar at the begging of the month.

    Here in the region for me Tillamook cheese is the only cheese I eat.

    Grilled cheese, cheese on roast beef sandwich, tuna sandwich, and added to salad'
    s.

  9. Top | #19
    Mrs Frizzle gmbteach's Avatar
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    I, much to my husbands disgust, do not like Brie, Camembert or blue cheese.

    I do like a nice crisp sharp cheddar, or Edam, Swiss, Gouda or Jarlesberg. I also like a nice cream cheese, and will often use this instead of butter in my sandwich. I love Parmesan, but not that dried stuff that you get in the grocery aisle.

  10. Top | #20
    Formerly Joedad
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmbteach View Post
    I, much to my husbands disgust, do not like Brie, Camembert or blue cheese.

    I do like a nice crisp sharp cheddar, or Edam, Swiss, Gouda or Jarlesberg. I also like a nice cream cheese, and will often use this instead of butter in my sandwich. I love Parmesan, but not that dried stuff that you get in the grocery aisle.
    Here's the real deal.

    Parmigiano-Reggiano.

    Much more than a fancy way to say “parmesan”, Parmigiano-Reggiano is a cheese that can only be made with extremely precise ingredients, in an extraordinarily particular process, in a 10,000-sq-km geographical area of Italy so carefully defined that you can make Parmigiano on one side of the small city of Bologna but not the other.

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