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Thread: Which political party are you?

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    Which political party are you?

    Republican or Federalist? It’s 1796. Defend your choice.

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    1796?

    I want to be in George Washington's party with Alexander Hamilton.

    That is where the power is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by untermensche View Post
    1796?

    I want to be in George Washington's party with Alexander Hamilton.

    That is where the power is.
    Well, only for four years.

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    Only for another year. But then 4 years of Adams.

    The parties of Hamilton and Jefferson were nothing like anything today. They were mainly a contrast between following the English model or the French.

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    Hard to say, I'd have to study it.The Articles Of Confederation failed, the govt was too weak. The system may not have survived without a strong fed that promoted free market capitalism, common currency, and banks. In the early 19th century there was debate over whether or not the fed should provide assistance to proper.

    Jefferson was attacked as a Francophile who was selling out the country to France. The sedition act was targeting French agents.

    For the Federalists making nice with the Bruits turned out to be a bad idea.

    As today I would have been an independent taking it issue by issue pragmatically on its merits.

    The Federalist-Republican divide was not much different in form then what we have today. Police smearing, claiming the other side weak on defense, limits on POTUS, and so on. The mess we have today is nothing new.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federalist_Party

    The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration party until the 3rd United States Congress as opposed to their opponents in the Anti-Administration party, was the first American political party. It existed from the early 1790s to the 1820s, with their last presidential candidate being fielded in 1816. They appealed to business and to conservatives who favored banks, national over state government, manufacturing, and (in world affairs) preferred Britain and opposed the French Revolution.

    The Federalists called for a strong national government that promoted economic growth and fostered friendly relationships with Great Britain as well as opposition to Revolutionary France. The party controlled the federal government until 1801, when it was overwhelmed by the Democratic-Republican opposition led by Thomas Jefferson. The Federalist Party came into being between 1792 and 1794 as a national coalition of bankers and businessmen in support of Alexander Hamilton's fiscal policies. These supporters developed into the organized Federalist Party, which was committed to a fiscally sound and nationalistic government. The only Federalist President was John Adams. George Washington was broadly sympathetic to the Federalist program, but he remained officially non-partisan during his entire presidency.[8]

    Federalist policies called for a national bank, tariffs and good relations with Great Britain as expressed in the Jay Treaty negotiated in 1794. Hamilton developed the concept of implied powers and successfully argued the adoption of that interpretation of the United States Constitution. Their political opponents, the Democratic-Republicans led by Thomas Jefferson, denounced most of the Federalist policies, especially the bank and implied powers; and vehemently attacked the Jay Treaty as a sell-out of republican values to the British monarchy. The Jay Treaty passed and the Federalists won most of the major legislative battles in the 1790s. They held a strong base in the nation's cities and in New England. After the Democratic-Republicans, whose base was in the rural South, won the hard-fought presidential election of 1800, the Federalists never returned to power. They recovered some strength through their intense opposition to the War of 1812, but they practically vanished during the Era of Good Feelings that followed the end of the war in 1815.[9]

    The Federalists left a lasting legacy in the form of a strong Federal government with a sound financial base. After losing executive power they decisively shaped Supreme Court policy for another three decades through the person of Chief Justice John Marshall.[10]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democr...publican_Party

    The Democratic-Republican Party (formally the Republican Party) was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison around 1792 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party run by Alexander Hamilton, who was Secretary of the Treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration.[8] From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System. It began in 1791 as one faction in Congress and included many politicians who had been opposed to the new constitution. They called themselves Republicans after their political philosophy, republicanism. They distrusted the Federalist tendency to centralize and loosely interpret the Constitution, believing these policies were signs of monarchism and anti-republican values. The party splintered in 1824, with the faction loyal to Andrew Jackson coalescing into the Jacksonian movement (which would soon acquire the name Democratic Party), the faction led by John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay forming the National Republican Party and some other groups going on to form the Anti-Masonic Party. The National Republicans, Anti-Masons, and other opponents of Andrew Jackson later formed themselves into the Whig Party.[9]

    During the time that this party existed, it was usually referred to as the Republican Party.[a] To distinguish it from the modern Republican Party (founded in 1854), historians, political scientists and pundits often refer to this party as the Democratic-Republican Party or the Jeffersonian Republican Party. The modern Republican Party founded in 1854 deliberately chose to name itself after the Jeffersonians.[10][11] Modern Democratic politicians claim Jefferson as their founder.[12]

    The party arose from the Anti-Administration faction which met secretly in the national capital (Philadelphia) to oppose Alexander Hamilton's financial programs (see the American School and the Hamiltonian economic program). Jefferson denounced the programs as leading to monarchy and subversive of republicanism. Jefferson needed to have a nationwide party to challenge the Federalists, which Hamilton was building up with allies in major cities. Foreign affairs took a leading role in 1794–1795 as the Republicans vigorously opposed the Jay Treaty with the United Kingdom, which was then at war with France. Republicans saw France as more democratic after its Revolution while the United Kingdom represented the hated monarchy. The party denounced many of Hamilton's measures as unconstitutional, especially the national bank.

    The party was strongest in the South and weakest in the Northeast. It demanded states' rights as expressed by the "Principles of 1798" articulated in the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions that would allow states to nullify a federal law.[13] Above all, the party stood for the primacy of the yeoman farmers. Republicans were deeply committed to the principles of republicanism, which they feared were threatened by the supposed monarchical tendencies of the Hamiltonian Federalists. The party came to power in 1801 with the election of Jefferson in the 1800 presidential election. The Federalists—too elitist to appeal to most people—faded away and totally collapsed after 1815. Despite internal divisions, the Republicans dominated the First Party System until partisanship itself withered away during the Era of Good Feelings after 1816.

    The party selected its presidential candidates in a caucus of members of Congress. They included Thomas Jefferson (nominated 1796; elected 1800–1801, 1804), James Madison (1808, 1812) and James Monroe (1816, 1820). By 1824, the caucus system had practically collapsed. After 1800, the party dominated Congress and most state governments outside New England. By 1824, the party was also split four ways and lacked a center as the First Party System collapsed. The emergence of the Second Party System in the 1820s and 30s realigned the old factions. One remnant followed Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren into the new Democratic Party by 1828. Another remnant, led by John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay, formed the National Republican Party in 1824 while some remaining smaller factions formed the Anti-Masonic Party, which along with some National Republican groups developed into the Whig Party by 1836.[14] Most remaining National Republicans would soon after go on to be a part of the Free Soil and modern Republican parties in the 1840s and 1850s.

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    Hamilton was the great genius of the day.

    He set the nation on a strong financial foundation by following the British model. Jefferson opposed everything Hamilton was doing.

    If it were up to Jefferson the nation would not have lasted 2 decades. Luckily he was the 3rd not 1st president.

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    I'm very clearly in Jefferson's Democrat-Republican party. Hamilton was a power-hungry wanna-be-dictator and even though the constitution granted the federal government more power than the articles of confederation did he was still unsatisfied.

    It makes sense that our very vocal "anarchist" is a fan of Hamilton.

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    Jefferson was a slave owner. Hamilton was an abolitionist.

    Enough said.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Harvestdancer View Post
    I'm very clearly in Jefferson's Democrat-Republican party. Hamilton was a power-hungry wanna-be-dictator and even though the constitution granted the federal government more power than the articles of confederation did he was still unsatisfied.

    It makes sense that our very vocal "anarchist" is a fan of Hamilton.
    No. Hamilton never aspired to dictatorship. That’s the Republicans, particularly Jefferson, lying about him. Hamilton has many issues, but he’s not in favor of any type of dictatorship. That’s what he predicted would befall France, and in 1799, he was proven right.

    SLD

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    I reside in Canada, hence the politics are somewhat different but as we are also a democracy, similar principles apply.

    My grandfather was asked by each provincial and federal party to run on their behalf over the years and he refused them all because aligning with one, automatically created a rift with the others.
    Likewise, I have had opportunity to go into politics and have declined beyond being involved in neighborhood steering committees and emergency response venues.

    I vote at each opportunity and my selections have ranged across all possibilities, each time selecting the candidate whom I felt represented the issues of the day in the best manner. Only once did I decline to vote federally, all
    parties having offended me equally by their disconnect with the voters.

    Democracy is a flawed system but in my experience, it is better than some of the alternatives so I always encourage people to vote or shut up.

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