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Thread: Your best chili recipes

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    Your best chili recipes

    Unfortunately I don't have a ton to contribute to this thread as I just got into cooking chili a few months ago, but I'm wondering what others consider some of the best chili they make?

    I just started making this recipe from All Recipes a few months ago, which is quite good:

    The Best Vegetarian Chili in the World

    I add extra onion, an additional jalapeno pepper, a dash of cayenne, garlic to taste, and I cook my own beans rather than using canned. As of yet I haven't found green chili peppers, so that hasn't made it's way into the recipe yet.

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    Elder Contributor Keith&Co.'s Avatar
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    I try a variety of chili recipes, but I get really good results from adding a can of refried beans to any pot of chili.
    Thickens the stew and retains heat like a banked fire.

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    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
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    Refering to the recipe link -
    White onions prefered over other types in Mexican foods.
    I imagine fresh poblanos qualify as green chilis and are widely available. I use lots of them.
    Many more varieties of beans if you use dried ones. I like half "small red beans" and half black beans (also small). Garbanzo beans seem a bit weird.
    If you like heat put the jalapenos and cayenne in towards end of cooking.

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    I've won some awards with my chili verde. I don't use a precise recipe, but it's a beanless lamb chili with fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder from New Mexico. I use lamb shoulder chops that I first sear over a fire, then dice into small cubes, put it all into a cast-iron dutch oven and bake at 300 for a few hours.

    At serving, I top with toasted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas), drizzle with a goat sour cream (a blend soft goat cheese into sour cream) and serve with a southern cornbread baked in a cast iron pan with some smoking hot bacon fat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronburgundy View Post
    I've won some awards with my chili verde. I don't use a precise recipe, but it's a beanless lamb chili with fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder from New Mexico. I use lamb shoulder chops that I first sear over a fire, then dice into small cubes, put it all into a cast-iron dutch oven and bake at 300 for a few hours.

    At serving, I top with toasted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas), drizzle with a goat sour cream (a blend soft goat cheese into sour cream) and serve with a southern cornbread baked in a cast iron pan with some smoking hot bacon fat.
    What do you use for the base?

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    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ronburgundy View Post
    I've won some awards with my chili verde. I don't use a precise recipe, but it's a beanless lamb chili with fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder from New Mexico. I use lamb shoulder chops that I first sear over a fire, then dice into small cubes, put it all into a cast-iron dutch oven and bake at 300 for a few hours.

    At serving, I top with toasted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas), drizzle with a goat sour cream (a blend soft goat cheese into sour cream) and serve with a southern cornbread baked in a cast iron pan with some smoking hot bacon fat.

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    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
    ...
    What do you use for the base?
    I imagine he puts the fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder all into a blender to make the sauce.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Treedbear View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
    ...
    What do you use for the base?
    I imagine he puts the fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder all into a blender to make the sauce.
    Very close. I blend everything you list, except for the onion and half the poblanos which get diced and added to the chili. I make it very thick and hearty, so it's probably 2/3 lamb meat.
    But if want to thin it out one could also add some stock like turkey, chicken or pork (don't think beef would work well). Also, subbing some of the lamb for pork can create more texure complexity and mellow out the "gaminess" of the lamb (for those who don't love lamb as much as I do).

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronburgundy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Treedbear View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by rousseau View Post
    ...
    What do you use for the base?
    I imagine he puts the fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder all into a blender to make the sauce.
    Very close. I blend everything you list, except for the onion and half the poblanos which get diced and added to the chili. I make it very thick and hearty, so it's probably 2/3 lamb meat.
    But if want to thin it out one could also add some stock like turkey, chicken or pork (don't think beef would work well). Also, subbing some of the lamb for pork can create more texure complexity and mellow out the "gaminess" of the lamb (for those who don't love lamb as much as I do).
    Do you mind letting us know the usual proportions of the ingredients? This sounds fantastic, wouldn't mind giving similar a try.

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    I find that making chili is an artful enterprise that is always in a process that’s slowly evolving such that the exact recipe is not precisely followed. I make chili the hard way and it gets harder each time, so I break the endeavor up into stages.

    First, i’ll prepare what we can dub the secret spice mix. You can measure out the ingredients and put it in a spice container. When you’re ready to make your next batch of chili, simply open and pour —not to mention save a lot of kitchen time.

    The 7 ingredients: Chili powder, Oregano, cumin, Regular table salt, Course black pepper, Crushed red pepper flakes, Nestle nesquik. The amounts available upon request.

    Let’s say you do that on a Friday night because you want chili Saturday night. Well, Saturday morning, cut up the veggies and get the prep work out the way.

    The 6 ingredients for the veggie mix: Green bell pepper, red bell pepper, jalapeño pepper, onion, Garlic, celery.

    After cutting it up, throw the mix in a lidded bowl and into the fridge. All that slicin’, dicin’, cuttin’, and cleanin’, who wants to be a cookin’?

    When it gets time to start cooking (later in the day), go ahead and open up your can goods:

    The 4 can goods are: diced tomatoes, tomato paste, kidney beans, pinto beans

    Time to start a cookin’:

    Pull out your two meats: 3 lbs of ground beef and a single full size smoked rogerwood sausage
    Cook them independently and throw in strainer. The sausage should be cut quarter size (so they look like twenty-five cent pieces/quarters.

    Pull out a huge pot, add a little bit of olive oil and cook the veggie mix until it’s good and seared. Throw in the cooked meats and two cans of tomato goods. Stir. Throw in the spices and beans.

    The only thing I didn’t mention is water. Use a cup of beef broth in its stead. A couple hours on low and it’s ready. The texture is awesome. The heat is spot on. The taste is off the chain.

    Like I said, it’s constantly evolving, but the baseline is intact. I’ll experiment with other things, but the changes are slight.

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