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Thread: Pew Research Center's Religious Typology

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    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
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    Pew Research Center's Religious Typology

    How the religious typology groups compare | Pew Research Center
    Their grouping:
    • Sunday Stalwarts - Religious traditionalists actively involved with their faith and engaged in their congregations
    • God-and-Country Believers - Socially and politically conservative, most likely to view immigrants as hurting American culture
    • Diversely Devout - Traditionally religious, but majorities also believe in psychics, reincarnation and that spiritual energy can be located in physical objects
    • Relaxed Religious - Say it's not necessary to believe in God to be a moral person. Religion is important to them, but few engage in traditional practices
    • Spiritually Awake - Few practice their religion in traditional ways, but most believe in heaven and hell, and subscribe to New Age beliefs
    • Religion Resisters - Most think organized religion does more harm than good; politically liberal and Democratic
    • Solidly Secular - Hold virtually no religious beliefs and reject New Age beliefs

    I took the quiz, and I'm Solidly Secular.

    Asked about:
    • Religious engagement
      • Involvement in religious organizations
      • Prayer
      • Religious service attendance
    • Religious and spiritual identity
      • Consider self spiritual
      • Consider self religious
    • Religious beliefs
      • Belief in God
      • Interpretation of scripture
      • God and morality
      • Belief in heaven
      • Belief in hell
      • Belief in spiritual energy
    • Sources of meaning and fulfillment
      • Meaning and fulfillment from religious faith
      • Meaning and fulfillment from spiritual practices
      • Meaning and fulfillment from being outdoors and experiencing nature
    • Religion’s impact
      • Impact of religious organizations on American society
      • Religious beliefs help with family
    • Demographics
      • Religious affiliation
      • Gender
      • Age
      • Race/ethnicity
      • Marital Status
      • Education
      • Income
      • Political identification
      • Region

    I am disappointed to discover that it did not ask about reincarnation.

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    Formerly Joedad
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    The category "diversely devout" does actually mention reincarnation.

    The highly religious are 39% and the non-religious are 29%. It's amazing and wonderful that almost a third of the population self-describe as non-religious.

    Of the "highly religious" 11% are headed into the secular camp, if not already there. I know the type, they attend traditional services because they are emotionally imprinted but their lives are much bigger and don't so closely relate to their old upbringings.

    I had a conversation with a traditional catholic the other day and he was very surprised to find out that "Easter" is named for a pagan goddess and pagan ritual. It just blew him away. I think he went home and immediately googled for more information.

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    Veteran Member Tigers!'s Avatar
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    I was classed as aSunday Stalwart. Not surprised by that.
    NOTE: No trees were killed in the sending of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.

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    I am solidly secular, no surprise there.

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    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.G.G. Moogly View Post
    The category "diversely devout" does actually mention reincarnation.
    That is correct, even if it was not asked about in the poll. But something like 20% - 30% of Americans believe in reincarnation, including many Xian ones. ‘New Age’ beliefs common among religious, nonreligious Americans | Pew Research Center Paradise Polled: Americans and the Afterlife | HuffPost Some other common beliefs: ghosts and channeling.

    Key findings about religion in Western Europe | Pew Research Center -- European "Nones" are less religious than American ones.

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    I am classed as So Sacrilegious As To Be Already Existing In Hell. Very small demographic on the atheist spectrum. I have bought extra sunblock.

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    Solidly secular, and among the 43% of that group who view religion as doing more harm than good.

    The % of those in the less religious, more liberal and secular categories is likely overstated by their results. Compared to the adult US population, their overall sample slightly more male, more unmarried, and more democratic leaning. All of those factors predict more secularism and less religiosity.

    Speaking of which, gender is an interestingly strong predictor with males outnumbering females almost 2:1 in the "secular" group and females outnumbering males almost 1.5 : 1 in the "God and Country" group.
    Other data shows this is not specific to the US, but a worldwide trend where males comprise the majority of people who are unaffiliated with a religion and/or identify as atheists. And it's not just about social behaviors like attending services, but private prayer and beliefs that religion is more important.

    There does not seem to be a notable difference in exposure to religion or social pressure to be religious that could account for that. That suggests there is some more general difference between the genders that leads women to be more religious. That doesn't imply that the difference must be biologically based, just something more general than direct socialization regarding religion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronburgundy View Post
    There does not seem to be a notable difference in exposure to religion or social pressure to be religious that could account for that. That suggests there is some more general difference between the genders that leads women to be more religious. That doesn't imply that the difference must be biologically based, just something more general than direct socialization regarding religion.
    If my marriage is typical I was well ahead of the curve but she eventually discovered the same things. Perhaps it has to do with raising children, bonding, keeping the nest and so doesn't have time to make new discoveries and deprovincialize. Or maybe I'm just a sexist pig.

    But even today with the kids well gone she seems to discover things at a slower rate. Academically she is light years ahead of me though. Again, maybe I'm just a sexist pig.

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    Solidly Secular.

    Eldarion Lathria

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    Sometimes I think that women tend to be more likely to be religious is because they feel the need for the social support systems that are often created among the religious. I once remember being surrounded be a group of Christian women. They were all talking about how much they loved their churches. They never mentioned any particular religious beliefs, but it was obvious that they found a lot of friendship and support from being members of a church. In the south, it's very difficult to find a social group unless you're a Christian.

    Sometimes, our local atheist group meetings are made up of more females than males. Again, it could be that women have a greater need for social networks compared to men. We rarely discuss anything related to religion or atheism when we get together. The women often discuss typical female issues, like motherhood, relationships with grown children, etc. Or we talk politics.

    Lately, our group has been decreasing in activity, so I've been spending more time with Christian women. We never talk about anything related to religion, so it's all good. My husband is my closest atheist friend and we were both atheists when we met about forty years ago.

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