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Thread: Which Bible

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    Which Bible

    I used the Oxford Bible in a philosophy class. It as as close to an academic work as it can get. Its roots are in the standard revised version. A work was commissioned to create a new translation using all available histocrical documents and archeological evidence. It was intended to be non denominational in slants.

    It has copious commentary on each book with translation issues and apparent problems. One I reber was a NT referral to a type of housing or architecture out of time for the period and place. It was also supposed to get rid of the Old English and put it in modern English terms.

    The companion book is the Oxford Bible Commentary. Pretty much everything you wanted to know about translation and historical issues from an academic view.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/The-Oxfor...4846552f5d43d6

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Re...andard_Version

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_Annotated_Bible

    The Oxford Annotated Bible (OAB) is a study Bible published by the Oxford University Press (OUP). The notes and the study material feature in-depth academic research from non-denominational perspectives, specifically secular perspectives for "Bible-as-literature" with a focus on the most recent advances in historical criticism and related disciplines, with contributors from mainline Protestant, Roman Catholic, Jewish, and non-religious interpretative traditions.

    The OAB also includes a number of interpretive essays. Essay topics include Bible translations, early Jewish history and the geography of the Bible. The NOAB also features maps of the Holy Land during various time periods. The NOAB is commonly used by colleges and universities.

    A fully revised Fourth Edition was released in May 2010. It contains new color maps and updated essays and commentaries. As always, versions with and without the Apocrypha were made available.

    A fully revised Fifth Edition was released on 1 April 2018 with similar improvements.

    Some groups, including fundamentalist and evangelical Protestants as well as traditional Catholics, object to the OAB because the editors adhere to contemporary, scholarly views of Biblical criticism, and thus call into question the traditional authorship of some books

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    If you are looking for a Torah Commentary, you should get The Torah a Modern Commentary. It's Hebrew and English. It has a modern gender neutral English translation. It has modern biblical criticism. It goes from the traditional to the modern.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HaRaAYaH View Post
    If you are looking for a Torah Commentary, you should get The Torah a Modern Commentary. It's Hebrew and English. It has a modern gender neutral English translation. It has modern biblical criticism. It goes from the traditional to the modern.
    Thanks. I am not really into Abram scripture across all three faiths beyond an understanding o theist claims and arguments.

    I am getting into something useful, learning Spanish and Chinese spoken by people around me. Seattle is diverse.

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    The 'Bible in English Just Like Jesus Talked' is the best bible. It's the original version.

    Eldarion Lathria

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    Contributor skepticalbip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eldarion Lathria View Post
    The 'Bible in English Just Like Jesus Talked' is the best bible. It's the original version.

    Eldarion Lathria
    Well the English King James version tries to make Jesus sound all la-di-dah. Everyone knows Jesus spoke plain old English like in the New International version.

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    There is no 'original' bible which is kind of the point.

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    Sapere aude Politesse's Avatar
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    I too like my New Oxford Annotated. If I need to consult the Greek, I use the Nestle-Aland.

    I actually love the KJV also, because few if any English versions match it for poetry and beauty. But it is obviously not a very "literal" translation, because it uses antiquated language and the Gospels were not in fact written in antiquated language.

    Aside from these, I do have quite a collection of other Biblical titles. My great-great-grandmother had a Scofield reference Bible which ended up in my hands, and has an honored place on my mantle. Her personal notes are scribbled all over it in pencil. My parochial high school left me with an NAB edition which I keep around; it has surprisingly good background info also, and is often helpful if I want to understand the Catholic take on a passage. I have a massive Hebrew-Greek Interlinear that I seldom use practically but which is fun to look through at times. We keep a French and Esperanto copy about, my partner and I both have the former for a second language, so that one is for reading practice. He's trying to learn Esperanto, and we have a fireside game where we'll go over the same passage in Greek and Esperanto and deduce how the translator went about trying to handle all the participles. I also keep about, for sentimental reasons, the NIV "Illustrated Children's Adventure Bible" that I owned as a kid. It is in pretty poor shape, loved to death. I have the largest Nag Hammadi Anthology on the shelf, as well as Marcus Borg's annotated portrayal of the Q document, a five gospels harmony, and a stand-alone copy of Thomas and the Acts of Paula and Thecla.

    And with all these books, when I have a quick question I usually open my phone anyway.

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