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Thread: A positive review for reincarnation in Scientific American.

  1. Top | #11
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    Houdini went around debunking the occult. He gave a secret message to his wife. If he died first and could speak through a psychic he would speak the message. Never happened.

    There was aguy who fell out of a tree, hit his head, and thereafter claiming he was reincarnated Tibetan monk, He called himself Lobsang Rampa and wrote books about psychic adventures of being a young mink. I read his books as a kid.

    He still has a following today I be live.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobsang_Rampa

    Lobsang Rampa is the pen name of an author who wrote books with paranormal and occult themes. His best known work is The Third Eye, published in Britain in 1956.

    Following the publication of the book, newspapers reported that Rampa was Cyril Henry Hoskin (8 April 1910 – 25 January 1981), a plumber from Plympton in Devon who claimed that his body hosted the spirit of a Tibetan lama going by the name of Tuesday Lobsang Rampa, who is purported to have authored the books. The name Tuesday relates to a claim in The Third Eye that Tibetans are named after the day of the week on which they were born.

    Explorer and Tibetologist Heinrich Harrer was unconvinced about the book's origins and hired a private detective from Liverpool named Clifford Burgess to investigate Rampa. "In January 1957, Scotland Yard asked him to present a Tibetan passport or a residence permit. Rampa moved to Ireland. One year later, the scholars retained the services of Clifford Burgess, a leading Liverpool private detective. Burgess’s report, when it came in, was terse. Lama Lobsang Rampa of Tibet, he determined after one month of inquiries, was none other than Cyril Henry Hoskin, a native of Plympton, Devonshire, the son of the village plumber and a high school dropout."[3] The findings of Burgess' investigation were published in the Daily Mail in February 1958.[4] It was reported that the author of the book was a man named Cyril Henry Hoskin, who had been born in Plympton, Devon, in 1910 and was the son of a plumber. Hoskin had never been to Tibet and spoke no Tibetan. In 1948, he had legally changed his name to Carl Kuon Suo before adopting the name Lobsang Rampa.[5] An obituary of Fra Andrew Bertie, Grand Master of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, claims that he was involved in unmasking Lobsang Rampa as a West Country plumber.[6]

    Rampa was tracked by the British press to Howth, Ireland, and confronted with these allegations. He did not deny that he had been born as Cyril Hoskin, but claimed that his body was now occupied by the spirit of Lobsang Rampa.[7] According to the account given in his third book, The Rampa Story, he had fallen out of a fir tree in his garden in Thames Ditton, Surrey, while attempting to photograph an owl. He was concussed and, on regaining his senses, had seen a Buddhist monk in saffron robes walking towards him. The monk spoke to him about Rampa taking over his body and Hoskin agreed, saying that he was dissatisfied with his current life. When Rampa's original body became too worn out to continue, he took over Hoskin's body in a process of transmigration of the soul.[8]

    Rampa maintained for the rest of his life that The Third Eye was a true story. In the foreword to the 1964 edition of the book, he wrote:


    I am Tuesday Lobsang Rampa, that is my only name, now my legal name, and I answer to no other.

    To Donald S. Lopez, Jr., an American Tibetologist, the books of Lobsang Rampa are "the works of an unemployed surgical fitter, the son of a plumber, seeking to support himself as a ghostwriter."[9]

    The authorship controversy was dramatised in a radio play, The Third Eye and the Private Eye, by David Lemon and Mark Ecclestone, first broadcast by BBC Radio 4 in August 2012.[10]

    Influence on Tibetologists’ callings[edit]

    Donald S. Lopez, Jr., in Prisoners of Shangri-La (1998), points out that when discussing Rampa with other tibetologists and buddhologists in Europe, he found that The Third Eye was the first book many of them had read about Tibet: "For some it was a fascination with the world Rampa described that had led them to become professional scholars of Tibet."

    Lopez adds that when he gave The Third Eye to a class of his at the University of Michigan without telling them about its history, the "students were unanimous in their praise of the book, and despite six prior weeks of lectures and readings on Tibetan history and religion, [...] they found it entirely credible and compelling, judging it more realistic than anything they had previously read about Tibet."[11]

  2. Top | #12
    Contributor DBT's Avatar
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    An interesting story, I read a couple of his books on recommendation in the early eighties, but they didn't grab me.
    Last edited by DBT; 06-16-2019 at 01:03 AM.

  3. Top | #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBT View Post
    An intersesting story, I read a couple of his books on recommendation in the early eighties, but they didn't grab me.
    As a teen I read scifi. The Third Eye was a good story for a kid. Didn't realize who he was until the 80s.

  4. Top | #14
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    Some more about Proto-Indo-European. Here is Grimm's law of stop-consonant correspondences, discovered by that famous folklorist. First, some examples of it:

    English be ~ Russian bu- ~ Latin fu- ~ Greek phu- ~ Sanskrit bhu- ~ *bhu-
    English is ~ Russian yest' ~ Latin est ~ Greek esti ~ Sanskrit asti ~ *esti
    (this *es- / *bhu- alternation for "to be" is across the Indo-European languages)
    English bear (to carry) ~ Russian ber- (to take) ~ Latin fer- ~ Greek pher- ~ Sanskrit bhar- ~ *bher-
    English brother ~ Russian brat ~ Latin frâter ~ Greek phrater (clansman) ~ Sanskrit *bhrâtar- ~ *bhreH2ter- (or @bhrâter-)

    English father ~ (Russian otets is not cognate) ~ Latin pater ~ Greek pater ~ Sanskrit pitar- ~ *pH2ter- (or *p@ter-)
    English foot ~ Latin ped- ~ Greek pod- ~ Sanskrit pad- ~ *ped-

    English the, that ~ Russian to ~ Latin istud ~ Greek to ~ Sanskrit tat ~ *to-
    English three ~ Russian tri ~ Latin três ~ Greek treis ~ Sanskrit trayas ~ *treies

    English two ~ Russian dva ~ Latin duô ~ Greek duô ~ Sanskrit dvâ- ~ *dwô
    English ten ~ Russian desyat' ~ Latin decem ~ Greek deka ~ Sanskrit dasa ~ *dekm

    English daughter ~ Russian doch' ~ (Latin filia not cognate) ~ Greek thugater ~ Sanskrit duhitar- ~ *dhugH2ter- (or *dhug@ter-)
    English door ~ Russian dver ~ Latin forum (public place) ~ Greek thura ~ Sanskrit dvara ~ *dhwer-

    English hundred ~ Russian sto ~ Latin centum ~ Greek hekaton ~ Sanskrit satam ~ *kmtom
    English hound (hunting dog) ~ (Russian sobaka likely not cognate) ~ Latin canis ~ Greek kuon ~ Sanskrit svan- ~ *k'wons

    English who ~ Russian kto ~ Latin quis ~ Greek tis ~ Sanskrit ki ~ *kwis

    English quick (fast) ~ Russian zhivoi ~ Latin vivus ~ Greek bios ~ Sanskrit jîva ~ *gwiH3wos (or *gwîwos) (alive)
    English queen (female monarch, orig. king's wife) ~ Russian zhena (wife) ~ (Latin femina, mulier not cognate) ~ Greek gunê ~ Sanskrit jani ~ *gwen- (woman)
    English cow ~ (Russian korova probably not cognate) ~ Latin bôs ~ Greek bous ~ Sanskrit go ~ *gwous

    English goose ~ Russian gus' ~ Latin ânser ~ Greek khên ~ Sanskrit hamsa ~ *gwH2ens (or *gwans)

  5. Top | #15
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
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    So we have this grid of Proto-Indo-European stop consonants:
    *p *t *ky *k *kw
    (*b) *d *gy *g *gw
    *bh *dh *gyh *gh *gwh

    • Rows: location in the mouth: labial, dental, palatovelar, velar, labiovelar
    • Columns: voicing (traditional reconstruction): unvoiced, voiced, voiced aspirate (with a puff of air)

    English has non-aspirate and aspirate variants of its unvoiced stops: pit vs. spit, tick vs. stick, kit vs. skit.

    Also, I'd written palatovelar as velar in my previous post, because they are often not distinguished in PIE reconstructions, likely because plain velars as opposed to palatovelars were not very common in PIE. Thus, *dekm and *kmtom ought to be *dekym and *kymtom

    The voicing of the PIE stops has been a source of controversy in recent decades. That is because voiced aspirates are usually found alongside unvoiced ones, and also because if one of /b/ and /p/ is missing, it is almost always /p/ and not /b/. This has led to hypothesis like the glottalic theory: unvoiced with aspirate variant, glottalic, and voiced with aspirate variant. A glottalic or ejective stop is pronounced with a small pause between the stop and the following sound. Thus,

    *p(h) *t(h) *ky(h) *k(h) *kw(h)
    (*p') *t' *ky' *k' *kw'
    *b(h) *d(h) *ky(h) *g(h) *gw(h)

    If this issue seems almost impossibly arcane, then that shows what value it has in testing claims of memories of past lives.

  6. Top | #16
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    The boy who thought he was a fighter pilot who got shot down in the war ''in his past life'' was probably influenced by a visit to the war museum;

    ''In the early 2000s, a sensational news story took the world by storm: a young boy was proven by experts — so said the reports — to have lived a past life as a World War II fighter pilot who was shot down. James Leininger, born in April 1998, is the subject of books and TV shows and countless articles citing him as proof of reincarnation, bolstered by an assailable mountain of undeniable proof. Today we're going to look into this amazing story of a young boy who thought he was reincarnated... and, in the process, also look at the people who helped him get there.''

    Maybe...just maybe...James Leininger had a Morey Bernstein of his own.

    Carol Bowman is the author of several books on reincarnated children and promotes herself as a "past life regression therapist", as if that's a thing. Hers is the book that Andrea Leininger turned to. Let's hear Bowman's own words from her website about her involvement in our case:

    In 2001 I got an email from a mother in Louisiana, Andrea Leininger. She told me that she had just gotten a copy of my first book, Children's Past Lives, and she believed that her two-year-old son, James, was having nightmares about a past life. He would wake up screaming about 3 or 4 times a week about his plane crashing... I told her to follow the guidelines in my book for helping James work through his nightmares...

    So from about the age of 3, James' parents were following the advice of a past life regression promoter to manage the boy's interest in WWII airplanes — having first already decided on their own that he was in fact a reincarnated pilot. Part of Bowman's advice was to repeatedly assure this toddler that he was, in fact, a reincarnated WWII fighter pilot. The Leiningers wrote in their book:''


    ''The basic facts of the case are that James Leininger was born in 1998, and while other children become obsessed with trucks or tractors or horses or plush toys, James' fixation was airplanes. He loved them. Every birthday or Christmas brought him a shower of new airplane toys. By the age of two, he knew many models by name, especially those most commonly produced as toys and featured in books: fighter planes, like Mustangs, Corsairs, and Spitfires. His parents took him to aviation museums, and he loved the WWII fighter planes. It even got to the point that his parents tried to distract him away from airplanes — unsuccessfully. It's a familiar experience to many parents''

  7. Top | #17
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    There is so much stuff floating around it is easy for a kid to sunconsiously create something. One of the first book I remember reading as a kid was 30 Seconds Over Tokyo.

    When I was reading Lord Of The rings in the 70s I fell asleep and dreamed the characters were calling to me. Human imagination.

  8. Top | #18
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    Including the power of suggestion on developing minds;

    ''Most of the research that has looked at the nature of suggestion has focused on its impact on memory. Elizabeth Loftus, for example, has demonstrated how leading questions and suggestive information can seriously distort a person’s memory for an observed event (e.g. Loftus, 1979).

    ''The pernicious effect of suggestive procedures has also been explored in relation to the creation of false memories within therapy. Years of empirical research suggest that false memories of childhood sexual abuse (satanic or non-satanic), reports of alien abduction and vivid tales of past lives, often share a common feature. In many cases these fantasy-based ‘memories’ have come about in response to hypnotic or other suggestive procedures carried out by therapists and misguided enthusiasts. However, it is also likely that the client’s own pre-existing beliefs may be sufficient to generate false memories even in the absence of explicit suggestions from the therapist.''

  9. Top | #19
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    My problem with reincarnation claims is that they are all too much like ghost sightings...
    What they have in common is a fad... a time-bound fad. What i mean is that all ghosts reported are from before the modern age... all ghosts carry candles for light, drag chains, and go wooowooowooo.. Never has anyone reported a ghost sighting of some kid on his cell phone that didn't realize he was hit by a car while texting and crossing the street. Similarly, all reincarnations are of famous people in history... deep history.. John Lennon's reincarnation should be about 30 years old now, right? You would think he would have discovered this by now and produced "Yesterday Again" by now... no one ever claimed to be the reincarnation of a used car dealer... only kings and queens apparently.

  10. Top | #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Nut View Post
    My problem with reincarnation claims is that they are all too much like ghost sightings...
    What they have in common is a fad... a time-bound fad. What i mean is that all ghosts reported are from before the modern age... all ghosts carry candles for light, drag chains, and go wooowooowooo.. Never has anyone reported a ghost sighting of some kid on his cell phone that didn't realize he was hit by a car while texting and crossing the street. Similarly, all reincarnations are of famous people in history... deep history.. John Lennon's reincarnation should be about 30 years old now, right? You would think he would have discovered this by now and produced "Yesterday Again" by now... no one ever claimed to be the reincarnation of a used car dealer... only kings and queens apparently.
    And what about the cave man ghosts? Are they just kind of wandering around wondering why they haven't seen any brontosauruses to hunt since that big rainstorm back in the day?

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