Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: City Council Nixes National Prayer

  1. Top | #1
    Formerly Joedad
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    PA USA
    Posts
    5,067
    Archived
    5,039
    Total Posts
    10,106
    Rep Power
    74

    City Council Nixes National Prayer

    Yes, the POA is no longer part of this Minnesota City Council's Meetings. I guess everyone will have to pray at home now.

    Minnesota city council has voted unanimously to stop reciting the Pledge of Allegiance

    Good idea.

  2. Top | #2
    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    The Sunshine State: The one with Crocs, not Gators
    Posts
    21,550
    Archived
    10,477
    Total Posts
    32,027
    Rep Power
    82
    Pledges of allegiance are a characteristic of totalitarian dictatorships. Free people don't make such pledges, and people who make and abide by such pledges are not free.

    (People who make, but do not abide by, such pledges are just liars).

  3. Top | #3
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Port Clinton, Ohio
    Posts
    2,159
    Archived
    591
    Total Posts
    2,750
    Rep Power
    61
    I wouldn't say liars. I'd say mumblers. The Pledge is about as meaningful as the "Have a nice days" that every day is full of. It is stupid, but it's enshrined. It's a cause for thoughtless people to get self-righteous and crazy about, in many a situation. I taught school, so it was a Monday morning ritual. The sing-songy way that we say the Pledge, breaking it into 7 rhythmic subsections, makes it even more inane and rote. BTW try to find a grade school student who can define 'allegiance'. Still I agree with post #2 that it's not a fit sentiment for a citizen of a 'free' society.

  4. Top | #4
    Veteran Member James Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,828
    Archived
    5,844
    Total Posts
    8,672
    Rep Power
    55
    BTW try to find a grade school student who can define 'allegiance'.
    I would imagine 'indivisible' would give some of them pause.

  5. Top | #5
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Port Clinton, Ohio
    Posts
    2,159
    Archived
    591
    Total Posts
    2,750
    Rep Power
    61
    They probably assume that the U.S. is a prime number.

  6. Top | #6
    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    out on a limb
    Posts
    1,394
    Rep Power
    14
    Kids don't think about what it means. I remember reciting "I pledge of allegiance to the flag ...".

  7. Top | #7
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Port Clinton, Ohio
    Posts
    2,159
    Archived
    591
    Total Posts
    2,750
    Rep Power
    61
    Me too! I also remember wondering why the letter after K had such a long name: Elemento.

  8. Top | #8
    Elder Contributor Keith&Co.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Far Western Mass
    Posts
    16,184
    Archived
    24,500
    Total Posts
    40,684
    Rep Power
    74
    I used to enjoy asking other kids questions like 'Why is the word 'democrat' in the pledge, but not 'republican'?' or 'I wonder how many people that say the pledge actually know what 'fidelity' means when they say it?'
    Then watch their face go blank for a moment, as they could not tell you if the word was in the pledge until they had run through the entire pledge in their head.

    I tried it once in the Navy, thinking those guys SURELY would have thought about the pledge before enlisting.
    Nope. Same glazed eyes, ten second pause...

  9. Top | #9
    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    The Sunshine State: The one with Crocs, not Gators
    Posts
    21,550
    Archived
    10,477
    Total Posts
    32,027
    Rep Power
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by ideologyhunter View Post
    Me too! I also remember wondering why the letter after K had such a long name: Elemento.
    I was an adult before I heard the US alphabet song - the UK one is completely different, and has a 3-3-5 scheme, repeated twice.

    It came as some surprise to me that you run LMNOP together, until I realised that the poor scansion was necessary to accommodate your weird pronunciation of the letter Zed, which we rhyme with 'M', thereby splitting the alphabet neatly in half, while you desperately race through the middle looking for a plausible rhyme with 'Zee'.

  10. Top | #10
    Veteran Member skepticalbip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Searching for reality along the long and winding road
    Posts
    4,921
    Archived
    12,976
    Total Posts
    17,897
    Rep Power
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ideologyhunter View Post
    Me too! I also remember wondering why the letter after K had such a long name: Elemento.
    I was an adult before I heard the US alphabet song - the UK one is completely different, and has a 3-3-5 scheme, repeated twice.

    It came as some surprise to me that you run LMNOP together, until I realised that the poor scansion was necessary to accommodate your weird pronunciation of the letter Zed, which we rhyme with 'M', thereby splitting the alphabet neatly in half, while you desperately race through the middle looking for a plausible rhyme with 'Zee'.
    i hadn't heard the British alphabet song so, out of curiosity, I did a Youtube search to hear what it sounded like. The Brits must have been infected by Yankinza and changed it since you were in school there. The version I found ran LMNOP together like their cousins across the pond... although it is, as a whole, different.





Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •