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Thread: Cricket... the game, not the insect

  1. Top | #51
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    Kings went 159-5 so definitely a manageable chase.

    However, Patriots big bats in Lewis and Gayle out early, and the Patriots stand at 20-2 after 5 overs. Kings are in the driver's seat at the moment.

  2. Top | #52
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    What a final. St Kitts and Nevis's top two batters out early. 70-3 mid-way, needing 90 more. However, they did just enough, not playing too aggressively. They make it to the final over needing 9 runs. Then they need 1 on the last ball to win, after getting a boundary, with the game drawn. Drakes manages and is the hero for the Patriots.

    This isn't quite England's ODI World Cup comeback, but it was pretty sweet.

    For a bonus, Willow's stream failed between the 16th and 19th overs. EEK! They got it back by the final over.

  3. Top | #53
    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Higgins View Post
    CPL T20 semis yesterday saw the Kings and Patriots win with relative ease. Gayle and Lewis opened strong which allowed the Patriots to stroll along and pick up boundaries here and there mid and late in the innings to manage a decent length chase to 179.

    Final today, but they just tossed the tarp on the field.
    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Higgins View Post
    Firstly, how in the heck did officials handle No Balls and fielded balls thrown to the wickets before replay?
    Same way all sports handled decisions. The umpire on the spot made a call based on what he thought he saw, and that call was deemed to always be correct, regardless of any opinions other people might have on the matter.

    An umpire who made a lot of calls in a lot of matches which a lot of people complained about might have his accreditation revoked. Or not.
    Cricket, it seems nuts because the bowler's foot and the wickets two different places for your eyes for each ball as you need to track ball movement.
    That's why there are two umpires on the field.

  4. Top | #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Higgins View Post
    CPL T20 semis yesterday saw the Kings and Patriots win with relative ease. Gayle and Lewis opened strong which allowed the Patriots to stroll along and pick up boundaries here and there mid and late in the innings to manage a decent length chase to 179.

    Final today, but they just tossed the tarp on the field.
    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Higgins View Post
    Firstly, how in the heck did officials handle No Balls and fielded balls thrown to the wickets before replay?
    Same way all sports handled decisions. The umpire on the spot made a call based on what he thought he saw, and that call was deemed to always be correct, regardless of any opinions other people might have on the matter.

    An umpire who made a lot of calls in a lot of matches which a lot of people complained about might have his accreditation revoked. Or not.
    Cricket, it seems nuts because the bowler's foot and the wickets two different places for your eyes for each ball as you need to track ball movement.

    The umpire at the bowler's end watches the bowler's foot to call no-balls. After the ball is delivered, he shifts his eyes to the batsman to watch for LBW and edges from the bat to the keeper or the slips. The second umpire positioned on-side watches for run-outs - to see if the batsmen had reached the crease before the stumps were touched with the ball.

    I played cricket for four years at Auburn with international students from India and Pakistan. It was a lot of fun even though I was not good at it. There is a lot of skill involved, and to be a good player you have to start at an early age. As someone starting out late, who had previously played some baseball, the hardest part for me was learning how to hold the bat and wield it effectively, and judging what the ball would do after it bounced. It was completely different from baseball. But I had a natural talent for keeping wickets, so I did that a lot.

  5. Top | #55
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    Probably not too hard to judge the line, but the transition to the ball tracking, I still think it must not be an easy job. Those umps are pretty sharp.

    I was reading an article about the CPL final and one note was on Cornwall. When he was finally taken out, he had 40+ but over 30 balls. Which sounds good, but even ignorant me knows that isn't enough for him. In addition to the relatively low strike rate, it was a bunch of possible 2's were 1's because Cornwall is not the quickest out there. He needs to be whacking a 200% strike rate to justify being on the pitch. That was one of the small things that helped hold St. Lucia to a lower score.



    Still newish to cricket, I've got a good feel on batting and bowling tactics, but fielding has me greatly confused, especially in Test Cricket. At some points you've got fielders everywhere. Sometimes four or five fielders behind the batter. Sometimes fielders surrounding the batter, with one of them getting a piggyback ride from the batter.
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  6. Top | #56
    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Higgins View Post
    Probably not too hard to judge the line, but the transition to the ball tracking, I still think it must not be an easy job. Those umps are pretty sharp.

    I was reading an article about the CPL final and one note was on Cornwall. When he was finally taken out, he had 40+ but over 30 balls. Which sounds good, but even ignorant me knows that isn't enough for him. In addition to the relatively low strike rate, it was a bunch of possible 2's were 1's because Cornwall is not the quickest out there. He needs to be whacking a 200% strike rate to justify being on the pitch. That was one of the small things that helped hold St. Lucia to a lower score.



    Still newish to cricket, I've got a good feel on batting and bowling tactics, but fielding has me greatly confused, especially in Test Cricket. At some points you've got fielders everywhere. Sometimes four or five fielders behind the batter. Sometimes fielders surrounding the batter, with one of them getting a piggyback ride from the batter.
    Fielding strategy is determined by both the bowling style, and the batsman's skill and confidence. Broadly speaking, when a batsman is facing slower deliveries, or the pitch is old, or the fielding side are hoping to intimidate the batsman, the field will be close in. This gives them a better chance of catching a poorly struck ball, but risks giving away more runs to a well struck ball, as nobody's on the boundary to stop four, and the outfielders may take longer to retrieve the ball even if it's not going to the boundary, so the batsmen might steal an extra run.

    Against a highly confident batsman on a good pitch facing fast bowling, a close-in field is just an invitation to score lots of boundaries. In such conditions, more outfielders to catch lofted boundary attempts, and to push down the strike rate, with a slip cordon to catch edges, is a better strategy.

  7. Top | #57
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    Well that seems terribly less complicated than I expected.

  8. Top | #58
    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Higgins View Post
    Well that seems terribly less complicated than I expected.
    "Broadly speaking" covers a multitude of sins.

    There are a lot of other factors that enter the equation. Lower strike rate is great for the fielding team at the start of a test match, but when taking wickets becomes more important than preventing runs, there's a big psychological element to field settings, such as trying to tempt batsmen into rash behaviour, or to make them impatient or frustrated. There's even an element of ego; setting a field for a star opening batsman that he would expect you to set for a nervous rookie tail-ender can cost you a lot of runs - but it can also make him go for deliveries he should leave, or loft balls he should drive along the ground, in an attempt to 'teach you a lesson' by scoring loads of quick runs.

    In the context of a test match, conceding sixteen runs per over for a couple of overs and then getting a wicket, is a much better result than letting the opponent's star batsman score a century or more, off an eighty over plus, low strike-rate innings. Of course the risk is that their star is patient, and scores twelve runs an over for five or six overs while never chasing the wider deliveries or lofting balls to places where the fielders have a chance to catch them, and then 'digs in' for a day or two before declaring at 600/3.

    Furthermore, the quality of the pitch declines dramatically over a five day test, and the ball behaves very differently as it ages, so the field that you set for the opening batsmen in their first innings with a new ball might be dramatically different from that on day three or four, when the pitch is breaking up and the ball is starting to exhibit reverse swing.

    The variety of pitch conditions, bowling action, ball age and condition, batsman experience and attitude, and scoring situation vs time remaining in the match, amongst other factors, make the exact field setting a very complicated decision indeed, particularly at the highest levels. And of course the skills of the fielders also needs to be considered. There's no point putting a man at a close in fielding position like silly point, if his reaction times are such that he drops any catching opportunity that comes his way. (Any position labelled 'silly' is a strong indication that the fielder in that spot needs super fast reflexes and a very poor sense of self-preservation).

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