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Thread: Where did those who rejected mainstream Christianity in the 60s-8os go?

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    Where did those who rejected mainstream Christianity in the 60s-8os go?

    Where did those who rejected mainstream Christianity in the 60s-8os go?

    Where did the ones who rejected mainstream Christian culture go in the 69s-80s? It was not atheism.

    Tmothy Leary mixed LSD with mysticism. One took drugs to find truth and spiritualn experience.

    Baba Ram Dass. A lot of people seemed to get something out of adopting Indian names.


    I knew somebody in the 80s who did EST. I told him I’d give him the same stiff for less money. When he came back I pretty much told him in general what was said.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EST_an...opular_culture
    The est Training was a two-weekend, 60-hour course offered from late 1971 to late 1984. The purpose of the seminar was "to transform one's ability to experience living so that the situations one had been trying to change or had been putting up with, clear up just in the process of life itself."[1] It "brought to the forefront the ideas of transformation, personal responsibility, accountability, and possibility."[2]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eckankar

    Eckankar is a religion founded by Paul Twitchell in 1965. It is a non-profit religious group with members in over one hundred countries. The spiritual home is the Temple of Eck in Chanhassen, Minnesota. Eckankar is not affiliated with any other religious group.

    God and recognize the presence of the Holy Spirit.[6][7][8]The movement teaches simple spiritual exercises, such as singing "Hu", called "a love song to God", to experience the Light and Sound of

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divine_Light_Mission

    The Divine Light Mission (Divya Sandesh Parishad; DLM) was an organization founded in 1960 by guru Hans Ji Maharaj for his following in northern India. During the 1970s, the DLM gained prominence in the West under the leadership of his fourth and youngest son (Prem Rawat). Some scholars noted the seen influence of the Bhagavad Gita and the Sant Mat tradition, but the western movement was widely as a

    new religious movement, a cult, a charismatic religious sect or an alternative religion. DLM officials said the movement represented a church rather than a religion.[1]

    When Shri Hans Ji Maharaj died in 1966, he was succeeded as guru by Prem Rawat, then just eight years old, despite rival claims from other family members. Although Prem Rawat was accepted as his father's successor, because of his age his family retained effective control of the DLM. In 1971, Rawat defied his mother by travelling to the UK and the US, where local branches of DLM were established and rapidly expanded. By 1973, DLM had over a million followers in India and tens of thousands of followers in the West, along with dozens of ashrams and hundreds of centers.[2]

    As Rawat grew older, he began to take a more active role in the movement and, when he turned sixteen, following the financially disastrous Millennium '73 festival, he took administrative control of the US branch. His increasing independence and his marriage to a non-Indian in 1974, caused a permanent rift with his mother and two of his brothers, Satpal Ji Maharaj and Bhole Ji Maharaj. They returned to India, where his eldest brother Satpal Maharaj took over the control of the Indian DLM.

    In the early 1980s, Rawat began disbanding the western DLM. He closed the ashrams and eliminated the remaining Indian influences from his presentation to make it independent of any specific culture or religion. In the US, UK, France and Australia, Elan Vital was formed to replace the DLM in supporting Rawat in his role as teacher.

    http://taggedwiki.zubiaga.org/new_co...fc69bbe605ce6d

    Timothy Leary

    American writer, psychologist, futurist, and advocate of psychedelic drug research and one of the first people whose remains have been sent into space. An icon of 1960s counterculture, Leary is most famous as a proponent of the therapeutic and spiritual benefits of LSD. He coined and popularized the catch phrase "Turn on, tune in, drop out."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ram_Dass

    Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American spiritual teacher, former academic and clinical psychologist, and author of many books, including the 1971 book Be Here Now.[1][2] He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation. He continues to teach, via his website; produces a podcast, with support from 1440 Multiversity; and pursues mobile app development through the Be Here Now network and the Love, Serve, Remember Foundation.

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    These people had a communal house or ashram in my Hartford Ct neighborhood in the 70s. Singles and families. I got up in the morning to do ther yoga in the morning for a dew weeks.

    Turned out to be a cult of an Indian guru. Americam converts took on Indian names. Men grew bears, wore turbans, and had Sikh cerimonial daggers. The guru decided who married who =, that sort of control.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3HO

    3HO (Healthy, Happy, Holy Organization), also known as Sikh Dharma of the Western Hemisphere or Sikh Dharma International, is an American organization that started in about 1970. It was founded in the West by Harbhajan Singh Khalsa, also called "Yogi Bhajan". Its followers are primarily Americans.[1][2][3][4][5] Its adherents are popularly referred to as the Sikh Dharma Brotherhood.[4] While referred to as the 3HO movement, "3HO" is strictly speaking the name only of the movement's educational branch.[2] Orthodox Sikhs, including the Sikh leadership in Amritsar, do not consider 3HO as Sikhs.[2][

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    And the Hari Krishnas I'd see at the airport and in Cleveland's Public Square in the 70s...would love to see a breakdown on what they've gone on to.

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    Veteran Member skepticalbip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ideologyhunter View Post
    And the Hari Krishnas I'd see at the airport and in Cleveland's Public Square in the 70s...would love to see a breakdown on what they've gone on to.
    They are still active just not 'in your face' like they were in the '70s.

    You can find one of their temples nearest you from their website.
    http://www.iskcon.org/

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    Sapere aude Politesse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ideologyhunter View Post
    And the Hari Krishnas I'd see at the airport and in Cleveland's Public Square in the 70s...would love to see a breakdown on what they've gone on to.
    Still around! They fed me lunch just a few weeks ago. And it was a damn good lunch, too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ideologyhunter View Post
    And the Hari Krishnas I'd see at the airport and in Cleveland's Public Square in the 70s...would love to see a breakdown on what they've gone on to.
    The Krishnas are still around. I watched a "procession" of a couple of hundred of them go by a few months ago in Amsterdam.

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    Elder Contributor Keith&Co.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve_bank View Post
    Where did those who rejected mainstream Christianity in the 60s-8os go?

    Where did the ones who rejected mainstream Christian culture go in the 69s-80s? It was not atheism.
    i dunno, i was an atheist the whole time my family was active in the Inner Peace Movement.

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    The American Hindu organization had sex scandals and child abuse scandals in their schools and communities.

    The majority of people appears to be like sheep. They need a leader to follow and identify with. The Abrahamic god is the ultimate alpha male. It is what Christians wag tails and expose belleys to in submission.

    The question is why some have avoided it.

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