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Thread: What will be some new jobs of the future?

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    Veteran Member Lumpenproletariat's Avatar
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    What will be some new jobs of the future?

    Will high-level scientists and certain other experts/professionals be the only ones not replaceable by robots/computers, in the future?

    It's possible that most of the current medium- and low-level jobs will be replaced by computers/robots, and that only a minority of today's "jobs" will still be necessary. Plus even many (most?) high-level jobs also will be replaced.

    But will there be new jobs different than those of today, needing to be done by humans? And especially, will there be jobs for humans of only average I.Q., who would not have the aptitude to be scientists? Even if a greater percent of humans could be scientists, it seems unlikely that half or even 1/4 of humans have the necessary ability to do scientific research. Only a tiny percent could be an Einstein or George Washington Carver, etc. Hopefully all those with such ability will be "discovered" and channeled into such careers, but the vast majority probably don't have those abilities.

    So, what about average humans, whose jobs of today will disappear? What new jobs for average folks will emerge in the future, needing to be done, but which won't be do-able by computers/robots?

    I will name one here. This is only one very specialized job, out of millions of other possible future jobs. I'll call this "Political Candidate Test-Creating," for lack of a better term.



    Political Candidate Test Creator

    In the future -- if not already -- there will be a need to have political candidates be tested to determine their competency. Even now we seem unaware how stupid many of the political candidates are, and so it doesn't occur to us that these job-seekers need to be tested in order to determine their competency to make good decisions.

    Sooner or later it will finally become apparent that we need something beyond the current speech-making abilities they show, as a guide to their competency. It is too easy for them to fake it, pretending to have knowledge, when in reality their only talent is to give good speeches. The ability to give a good speech is little or no indicator of one's knowledge of the subject matter they are to deal with.

    A state could require all candidates seeking ballot status to take tests on history or public affairs etc., to demonstrate their knowledge. It possibly could even be voluntary, and those refusing to take the tests would be identified to the voters as unwilling to take the tests. So the system could in effect put pressure on them to take the tests, and most or all of them would have their ranking shown on the ballot, indicating how they scored on the tests.


    Who would create the tests, to determine what is tested?

    The items/questions on the test need not be highly specialized. An ordinary person would have the ability to choose what is included in the tests and put forth to the candidates for them to answer.

    These tests need not be only for rating political candidates, but absolutely anyone wishing to take them to determine how their knowledge rates in comparison to others. The tests might be useful for many other purposes beyond judging political candidates. Teachers should also be expected to take such tests, to demonstrate their competency or superior knowledge.

    The creation of the tests should be open to absolutely anyone wishing to participate, as volunteers, and some would be hired to do this and paid. Probably those hired would be chosen from among earlier volunteers, after a period of serving and demonstrating special ability or interest in creating the tests.

    Isn't this a job which computers/robots could not do? Of course they could make some choices of the content of the tests, but choosing what is important to be tested is not something a machine could do. Deciding what should be tested, or what knowledge the candidates should demonstrate, is a subjective judgment, rather than something mechanical. The computers would have vast memories with all the correct answers, but they could not judge what test items should be on the test for adequately rating the candidates, to judge their competency.

    Perhaps the administering and scoring the tests would be mechanical, so the computers would do that part. However, there still has to be human checking procedures to ensure that the tests are administered and scored in a totally neutral way with no chance for any cheating. This might require a number of ordinary workers who would do much checking and monitoring of the procedures. If computers did this part, there is the danger that a fraudulent programmer or technician might be able to subvert the procedure, to falsify the results. So numerous redundancy checks would be necessary, to do verifications at a low technical level. There has to be public confidence that there could be no cheating by parties having exclusive access to information or components.


    Performing this function, of creating these tests or choosing what is to be tested, will be a much greater contribution to society than current factory jobs, or jobs in steel mills, which will more and more be replaced by machines.

    What are some other jobs of the future which humans could perform and could not be done by machines?

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    the baby-eater
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lumpenproletariat View Post
    This is only one very specialized job, out of millions of other possible future jobs. I'll call this "Political Candidate Test-Creating," for lack of a better term.
    Neat. Got any others?


    Here's some I thought of:

    Hoverbike mechanic

    Hoverbike salesperson

    Hoverbike stunt performer

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    I've read arguments, and tend to believe that machines have so far grabbed a lot of the.. low-hanging fruit. They're doing the stuff that's not very difficult for machines to do. So the hype of AI taking over the entire economy is somewhat overblown, and is mostly driven by journalists who want ad views and know nothing about the technology they're talking about.

    That being said I think this graphic sums it up well:



    The people who are going to be most successful in the future are those who have to think, and do non-routine jobs. Machines are good at simple routines.

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    Elder Contributor Keith&Co.'s Avatar
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    More and more situations seem to be being offered to completely erase any sort of inconvenience.
    Drive-thru fast-food delivers, now.
    You can hire Uber, NOT to get a ride to the supermarket, but to go pick up your groceries.
    And the driving around here really makes sense when I realize that they just CANNOT be inconvenienced by waiting for a light, slowing for an obstruction, stopping for a pedestrian. Or blazing through an intersection after the light because 'if that guy three cars ahead hadn't been making a left turn, I'd have made THIS light.'

    I expect future job opportunities to blossom around anything that further reduces inconvenience. Some way to get someone to stand in line for you while you're on the way to the DMV so you show up just as your number is called? Some way to get an elevator usher to press the call button while you're parking the car. Some app that pays for the soda as you walk up to the machine because that five second wait after pushing the button is SO 2010...

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    Some new plumbing specialty...
    Sex Doll Maintenance.

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    Deep fake video maker.

    Deep fake video detector.

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    We are seeing an increasing number of jobs that involve doing what people used to do at home.

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    Veteran Member skepticalbip's Avatar
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    If we take the predictions of the doom-cryers seriously then subsistence farming will be the largest and most popular job of the future.

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    Mazzie Daius fromderinside's Avatar
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    We seem to be selling humans short. Arts and service, especially elder service, are ripe fruit now that birthrates are down and age is up. I just love testing new skills for alexa on people like me who have diminishing memory, mobility, and sense capabilities. When I retired I could still make list sets that beat expert systems in most any field. I expect I can still.

    What has increased in intelligent processing is language use and understanding in machines. Even in 2002 language processing systems had error rates too high for normal commerce in low level language transactions. Now, they are getting pretty good mostly due to processing and memory increases rather than new language algorithms. So there's a lot of space still open for human transactional work.

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    Seriously, remember George Jetson? His job at Spacely Sprockets was to sit at his desk and push a button.

    We are already seeing robotic machines making robotic machines.

    Over the last 30 years the skill required in electrical engineering has slowly diminished. It many cases degraded to the what would be a technician in the past.

    Jobs and employment as we know it today will fall by the wayside.

    From a show on China it has gone almost paperless in commerce. All transactions are though wireless devices. No cash in major cities. At a fast food place to pay you read a code on a menu with your device.

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