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Thread: California’s Fair Pay to Play Act

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    California’s Fair Pay to Play Act

    his week LeBron James, Bernie Sanders and countless other heavy hitters lent their support to a monumental bill in California that, if passed, could forever alter the business of collegiate athletics and the entire American sports landscape. SB 206 (also known as the Fair Pay to Play Act) would permit collegiate athletes in the state, which include schools like USC, UCLA, UC Berkeley and Stanford, to seek payment for use of their name, image or likeness. The NCAA, the governing body for college sports in America, has long prohibited its student-athletes from earning any semblance of profit associated with their skill set or name cache. Meanwhile college sports are a $14bn industry, and the NCAA reported a staggering $1.1bn in revenue generated last year, thanks in large part to the unpaid labor of its athletes. The California state assembly this week voted unanimously in favor of the bill. It is expected to overwhelmingly pass in the California state senate soon, and then will land on the desk of California governor Gavin Newsom, who will have 30 days to sign or veto the bill.
    Teh Gruaniad

    I knew that college sport was big money but I had no idea that it is this big. The education system in the US is a racket.

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    Good. Student athletes should be able to earn money in any manner that's legal, other than point-shaving or fixing games. Capitalism for everyone. As for the money generated by sports that varies widely by university. The reason you see University of Nowhere go and play teams like Alabama is that U of Nowhere has little money. They get a good payout for taking that 70-3 beatdown. At least it's not Cumberland @ Ga Tech.

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    NCAA basketball March Madness has a $1 billion a year deal. That results in about $1,000,000 per player in the tournament for revenue.

    College football, Ohio State makes more than $600,000 per player in profit a year.

    I'm not exactly sold on players getting agents. I'd rather see a fair percentage of the money for their efforts go into some sort of fund that can be made available five years after their play in College. Arbitrary, but I can't imagine how happy some players on the smaller sport teams would feel about playing while hurt (think Tennis), while football players are driving Benz's.

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    Good bill and good thread. While we're at it, we should start asking what other free labor people do in service of moneymaking for other people. It'll probably be a while before all of it gets recognized and compensated, if it ever does, but stuff like this is a welcome sign that we're at least starting to acknowledge the concept.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PyramidHead View Post
    Good bill and good thread. While we're at it, we should start asking what other free labor people do in service of moneymaking for other people. It'll probably be a while before all of it gets recognized and compensated, if it ever does, but stuff like this is a welcome sign that we're at least starting to acknowledge the concept.
    "Internships".

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    If the NCAA prohibits it then do they loose amateur status?

    If a college runner gets compensation can he compete in non colligate amateur athletics'?

    Cooler basketball, football, and baseball has long been a semi pro farm league supplying pro sports. The quality of the education athletes manage to get has been questionable for a very long time.

    What does it cost for 4 years at a major school including all expenses? It is not like they get nothing.

    Many who make to college have as athletes been coddled from the start.

    Should they give up the right to their name? No. Should they get paid, no.

    Profits go to the school for things like scholarships for people who can not catch a football. There are two sides to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve_bank View Post
    If the NCAA prohibits it then do they loose amateur status?

    If a college runner gets compensation can he compete in non colligate amateur athletics'?

    Cooler basketball, football, and baseball has long been a semi pro farm league supplying pro sports. The quality of the education athletes manage to get has been questionable for a very long time.

    What does it cost for 4 years at a major school including all expenses? It is not like they get nothing.

    Many who make to college have as athletes been coddled from the start.

    Should they give up the right to their name? No. Should they get paid, no.

    Profits go to the school for things like scholarships for people who can not catch a football. There are two sides to it.
    So there are a couple questions then. Can the NCAA profit off of this? Shall the Colleges profit off of this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Higgins View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by steve_bank View Post
    If the NCAA prohibits it then do they loose amateur status?

    If a college runner gets compensation can he compete in non col ligate amateur athletics'?

    Cooler basketball, football, and baseball has long been a semi pro farm league supplying pro sports. The quality of the education athletes manage to get has been questionable for a very long time.

    What does it cost for 4 years at a major school including all expenses? It is not like they get nothing.

    Many who make to college have as athletes been coddled from the start.

    Should they give up the right to their name? No. Should they get paid, no.

    Profits go to the school for things like scholarships for people who can not catch a football. There are two sides to it.
    So there are a couple questions then. Can the NCAA profit off of this? Shall the Colleges profit off of this?
    The reasonable boundary is you lose amateur status when you accept pay. A pro athlete is general one who plays for money. It keeps pros from competing in amateur and college competition.

    I'd have to look up how the NCAA is structured, profit or non profit.

    Like the Olympics it is a business that employs career people. No doubt there is some corruption in the NCAA. Extravagant offices, high salaries, and perks and the like. Somebody who plays college sports at a upper tier school even if not destined for pros gets a leg up post college. It carries weight on a resume.

    What there needs to be is transparency as to where the college revenue from sports goes. No doubt there is corruption there as well, evidenced by the admissions scandal. Top coaches make a lot of money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TSwizzle View Post
    his week LeBron James, Bernie Sanders and countless other heavy hitters lent their support to a monumental bill in California that, if passed, could forever alter the business of collegiate athletics and the entire American sports landscape. SB 206 (also known as the Fair Pay to Play Act) would permit collegiate athletes in the state, which include schools like USC, UCLA, UC Berkeley and Stanford, to seek payment for use of their name, image or likeness. The NCAA, the governing body for college sports in America, has long prohibited its student-athletes from earning any semblance of profit associated with their skill set or name cache. Meanwhile college sports are a $14bn industry, and the NCAA reported a staggering $1.1bn in revenue generated last year, thanks in large part to the unpaid labor of its athletes. The California state assembly this week voted unanimously in favor of the bill. It is expected to overwhelmingly pass in the California state senate soon, and then will land on the desk of California governor Gavin Newsom, who will have 30 days to sign or veto the bill.
    Teh Gruaniad

    I knew that college sport was big money but I had no idea that it is this big. The education system in the US is a racket.
    Creating a generation of debt peons.

  10. Top | #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve_bank View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Higgins View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by steve_bank View Post
    If the NCAA prohibits it then do they loose amateur status?

    If a college runner gets compensation can he compete in non col ligate amateur athletics'?

    Cooler basketball, football, and baseball has long been a semi pro farm league supplying pro sports. The quality of the education athletes manage to get has been questionable for a very long time.

    What does it cost for 4 years at a major school including all expenses? It is not like they get nothing.

    Many who make to college have as athletes been coddled from the start.

    Should they give up the right to their name? No. Should they get paid, no.

    Profits go to the school for things like scholarships for people who can not catch a football. There are two sides to it.
    So there are a couple questions then. Can the NCAA profit off of this? Shall the Colleges profit off of this?
    The reasonable boundary is you lose amateur status when you accept pay. A pro athlete is general one who plays for money. It keeps pros from competing in amateur and college competition.

    I'd have to look up how the NCAA is structured, profit or non profit.

    Like the Olympics it is a business that employs career people. No doubt there is some corruption in the NCAA. Extravagant offices, high salaries, and perks and the like. Somebody who plays college sports at a upper tier school even if not destined for pros gets a leg up post college. It carries weight on a resume.

    What there needs to be is transparency as to where the college revenue from sports goes. No doubt there is corruption there as well, evidenced by the admissions scandal. Top coaches make a lot of money.

    Lots of things that ostensibly look good on a resume mean absolutely nothing tangible at all. One often sees that used dishonestly within the/an organization itself as bait in compliance and manipulation. Any moneymaking enterprise loves not having to pay the revenue generators.

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