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Thread: The US and Pol Pot

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    The US and Pol Pot

    Quote Originally Posted by History.com
    U.S. President Richard M. Nixon also ordered a secret bombing campaign as part of the Vietnam War. Over the span of four years, U.S. planes dropped 500,000 tons of bombs on Cambodia, more than three times the amount dropped on Japan during World War II.

    By the time the U.S. bombing campaign ended in August 1973, the number of Khmer Rouge troops had increased exponentially, and they now controlled approximately three-quarters of Cambodia’s territory. Soon after, they began shelling Phnom Penh with rockets and artillery.

    A final assault of the refugee-filled capital started in January 1975, with the Khmer Rouge bombarding the airport and blockading river crossings. A U.S. airlift of supplies failed to prevent thousands of children from starving.

    Finally, on April 17, 1975, the Khmer Rouge entered the city, winning the civil war and ending the fighting. About half a million Cambodians had died during the civil war, yet the worst was still to come.

    Cambodian Genocide


    Almost immediately after taking power, the Khmer Rouge evacuated Phnom Penh’s 2.5 million residents. Former civil servants, doctors, teachers and other professionals were stripped of their possessions and forced to toil in the fields as part of a re-education process.

    Those that complained about the work, concealed their rations or broke rules were usually tortured in a detention center, such as the infamous S-21, and then killed. During the Cambodian genocide, the bones of millions of people who died from malnutrition, overwork or inadequate health care also filled up mass graves across the country.

    Under Pol Pot, the state controlled all aspects of a person’s life. Money, private property, jewelry, gambling, most reading material and religion were outlawed; agriculture was collectivized; children were taken from their homes and forced into the military; and strict rules governing sexual relations, vocabulary and clothing were laid down.

    The Khmer Rouge, which renamed the country Democratic Kampuchea, even insisted on realigning rice fields in order to create the symmetrical checkerboard pictured on their coat of arms.

    At first, Pol Pot largely governed from behind the scenes. He became prime minister in 1976 after Prince Norodom was forced to resign. By that time, border skirmishes were occurring regularly between the Cambodians and the Vietnamese.

    The fighting intensified in 1977, and in December 1978 the Vietnamese sent more than 60,000 troops, along with air and artillery units, across the border. On January 7, 1979, they captured Phnom Penh and forced Pol Pot to flee back into the jungle, where he resumed guerrilla operations.
    Why did the USA attack Vietnam again? This side effect of that war, and American atrocity in that war led to the Khmer Rouge taking power, and that led to the Cambodian Genocide of Pol Pot.

    It was the Vietnamese that ended it, but then they held control of Cambodia for a decade, during which the US backed Pol Pot as a rebel in the jungle again? Did I read that correctly? That's pretty messed up if so.
    Last edited by Jolly_Penguin; 09-17-2019 at 07:47 PM.

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    Contributor skepticalbip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jolly_Penguin View Post
    Why did the USA attack Vietnam again? This side effect of that war, and American atrocity in that war led to the Khmer Rouge taking power, and that led to the Cambodian Genocide of Pol Pot.

    It was the Vietnamese that ended it, but then they held control of Cambodia for a decade, during which the US backed Pol Pot as a rebel in the jungle again? Did I read that correctly? That's pretty messed up if so.
    Just WOW.... The fact that you know nothing about the Pathet Lao and/or the Khmer Rouge doesn't mean your inventing your own history constitutes reality.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skepticalbip View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jolly_Penguin View Post
    Why did the USA attack Vietnam again? This side effect of that war, and American atrocity in that war led to the Khmer Rouge taking power, and that led to the Cambodian Genocide of Pol Pot.

    It was the Vietnamese that ended it, but then they held control of Cambodia for a decade, during which the US backed Pol Pot as a rebel in the jungle again? Did I read that correctly? That's pretty messed up if so.
    Just WOW.... The fact that you know nothing about the Pathet Lao and/or the Khmer Rouge doesn't mean your inventing your own history constitutes reality.
    So correct me. I'm only relaying what I read at History.com.

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    Veteran Member Sarpedon's Avatar
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    Most people dismiss the History Channel as shallow and sensationalist. Also, it has been criticized for its pro-United States bias. I recommend that you not use that as your sole source. In fact, I'd recommend you not discuss any topic if you've only got one source for it. Do you have a local library?

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    I have read multiple sources. Perhaps I am simply outside your USA propaganda bubble since I don't live there and none of the sources I read are from there.

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    Veteran Member Sarpedon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jolly_Penguin
    So correct me. I'm only relaying what I read at History.com.
    I have read multiple sources. Perhaps I am simply outside your USA propaganda bubble since I don't live there and none of the sources I read are from there.
    History.com is an American company. Given that you've contradicted yourself already in this thread, it his hard to imagine you looking any more foolish.

    Me, I've never denied that the US supported Pol Pot. That was a shameful era in our history.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarpedon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jolly_Penguin
    So correct me. I'm only relaying what I read at History.com.
    I have read multiple sources. Perhaps I am simply outside your USA propaganda bubble since I don't live there and none of the sources I read are from there.
    History.com is an American company. Given that you've contradicted yourself already in this thread, it his hard to imagine you looking any more foolish.

    Me, I've never denied that the US supported Pol Pot. That was a shameful era in our history.
    You are a shameful era of your history.

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