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Thread: Scientists Are Starting to Take Warp Drives Seriously, Especially One Specific Concept

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    Loony Running The Asylum ZiprHead's Avatar
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    Scientists Are Starting to Take Warp Drives Seriously, Especially One Specific Concept

    https://www.sciencealert.com/how-fea...-s-the-science

    However, in recent years, the scientific community has become understandably excited and skeptical about claims that a particular concept – the Alcubierre Warp Drive – might actually be feasible.

    This was the subject of a presentation made at this year's American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Propulsion and Energy Forum, which took place from August 19th to 22nd in Indianapolis.

    This presentation was conducted by Joseph Agnew – an undergraduate engineer and research assistant from the University of Alabama in Huntsville's Propulsion Research Center (PRC).

    As part of a session titled "The Future of Nuclear and Breakthrough Propulsion", Agnew shared the results of a study he conducted titled "An Examination of Warp Theory and Technology to Determine the State of the Art and Feasibility".
    Make it so.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiprHead View Post
    https://www.sciencealert.com/how-fea...-s-the-science

    However, in recent years, the scientific community has become understandably excited and skeptical about claims that a particular concept – the Alcubierre Warp Drive – might actually be feasible.

    This was the subject of a presentation made at this year's American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Propulsion and Energy Forum, which took place from August 19th to 22nd in Indianapolis.

    This presentation was conducted by Joseph Agnew – an undergraduate engineer and research assistant from the University of Alabama in Huntsville's Propulsion Research Center (PRC).

    As part of a session titled "The Future of Nuclear and Breakthrough Propulsion", Agnew shared the results of a study he conducted titled "An Examination of Warp Theory and Technology to Determine the State of the Art and Feasibility".
    Make it so.
    "Scientists also estimate that the total energy requirement would be equivalent to the mass of Jupiter"

    Hm

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    Super Moderator Bronzeage's Avatar
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    In the meantime we're trying to figure out if the radiation absorbed during a flight to Mars will kill the astronauts, or if the loss of bone mass will leave them unable to function in gravity.

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    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
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    That's all very nice, but there's not much to be excited about until engineers start to take warp drives seriously.

    Scientists have an unfortunate habit of declaring something "possible" and then muttering under their breath about "within fifty kilometres of the event horizon of a rotating black hole", "assuming the existence of matter with negative mass", "as long as the energy available is at least six days of total solar output", and/or "for a spherical, frictionless horse, in a perfect vacuum".

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    Loony Running The Asylum ZiprHead's Avatar
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    LOL, I did consider putting it in pseudoscience.
    ITMFA

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    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    That's all very nice, but there's not much to be excited about until engineers start to take warp drives seriously.

    Scientists have an unfortunate habit of declaring something "possible" and then muttering under their breath about "within fifty kilometres of the event horizon of a rotating black hole", "assuming the existence of matter with negative mass", "as long as the energy available is at least six days of total solar output", and/or "for a spherical, frictionless horse, in a perfect vacuum".
    Are there non- rotating black holes?

    Also it does say, right there in the article, the energy equivalent of one Jupiter mass. I believe that's ever so slightly more than six days of solar output.

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    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jokodo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    That's all very nice, but there's not much to be excited about until engineers start to take warp drives seriously.

    Scientists have an unfortunate habit of declaring something "possible" and then muttering under their breath about "within fifty kilometres of the event horizon of a rotating black hole", "assuming the existence of matter with negative mass", "as long as the energy available is at least six days of total solar output", and/or "for a spherical, frictionless horse, in a perfect vacuum".
    Are there non- rotating black holes?
    Probably not, but they were the type first hypothesised by Schwarzschild, mainly because the maths is a lot simpler if you ignore angular momentum. Most black holes are presumed to rotate very rapidly indeed due to their small radii, and the large angular momenta of their parent stars.
    Also it does say, right there in the article, the energy equivalent of one Jupiter mass. I believe that's ever so slightly more than six days of solar output.
    Which rather underscores my point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    Probably not, but they were the type first hypothesised by Schwarzschild, mainly because the maths is a lot simpler if you ignore angular momentum. Most black holes are presumed to rotate very rapidly indeed due to their small radii, and the large angular momenta of their parent stars.
    Also it does say, right there in the article, the energy equivalent of one Jupiter mass. I believe that's ever so slightly more than six days of solar output.
    Which rather underscores my point.
    I did a quick calculation. According to these figures, one Jupiter mass equivalent is more than 14 billion years worth of total solar output (at current levels).

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    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jokodo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    Probably not, but they were the type first hypothesised by Schwarzschild, mainly because the maths is a lot simpler if you ignore angular momentum. Most black holes are presumed to rotate very rapidly indeed due to their small radii, and the large angular momenta of their parent stars.
    Also it does say, right there in the article, the energy equivalent of one Jupiter mass. I believe that's ever so slightly more than six days of solar output.
    Which rather underscores my point.
    I did a quick calculation. According to these figures, one Jupiter mass equivalent is more than 14 billion years worth of total solar output (at current levels).
    Thanks. How many frictionless spherical horsepower fortnights is that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jokodo View Post

    I did a quick calculation. According to these figures, one Jupiter mass equivalent is more than 14 billion years worth of total solar output (at current levels).
    Thanks. How many frictionless spherical horsepower fortnights is that?
    According to their data (5.4e41J for earth's mass equivalent, which I multiplied with 318 earth masses from another source), about 1.72e44 watt seconds. I believe that's about 1.9e35 horsepower fortnights.

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