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Thread: Anyone bought or sold a used car privately ?

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    Anyone bought or sold a used car privately ?

    What's the script for buying a car privately ? I am wary of handing over a check for thousands of dollars and something happen where I don't get actual ownership, the seller absconds with my money or something. Same with selling, I hand over the keys and slip and the check doesn't clear and I can't get my car back.

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    Make sure they have a clear title.
    There should be no liens on.
    If the seller is one person, make sure the title doesn’t have the word, “AND” between names if there is a co-owner.
    Take a mechanic to inspect the vehicle.
    See if you can secure a second vehicle key.
    Do a VIN check (usually 17 digits).

    The vehicle may be salvaged, and if it is, the most current title should indicate as much. If it’s because of water, be extra cautious that you’re not buying junk.

    Put YOUR eyes on both the title and vehicle before purchasing.

    Get a photocopy of sellers ID.

    Check your state for lemon laws especially concerning right of rescension. For instance, if you have three days, know that afterwards, if the car breaks in half, both half’s are yours.

    Do not buy the car if the name on THE FRONT OF the title doesn’t match the ID. If there’s writing on the back, do the transaction at your local DMV.

    If you inspect the car to your satisfaction, you can hand over the certified funds (that you can get from a local bank) when you can personally see your name on THE FRONT of the title. I didn’t say money order, btw. It’s a cashiers check, or certified check, drawn off a bank.

    If BULLSHIT rears it’s head, whatever guise it might fall under, WALK AWAY, if it’s starts getting past your ankles.

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    Damn it, I read your post too quick. It’s different for the seller.

    You can accept CASH.
    You can accept certified funds from a local bank.

    No personal checks. AT ALL, period.
    I’d be highly cautious of money orders. The risk is higher and can come back to bite you.
    Debit is dangerous, and credit moreso.

    Do not sign over the title until funds are secure.

    Get a copy of buyers ID.

    Take your license plate off and turn them in YOURSELF.

    Notify the insurance company and DMV of vehicle sale—as I don’t know the loophole gotcha’s in your state.

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    Oh, and don’t go into the car storage business. You’re selling a vehicle for money, not making a commitment for free storage and security for weeks longer than whatever time frame that might get thrown about in the mix. Accommodate but with limits. Flexible, yes, but crazy so, no.

    Give more details. We can go over the funds part more.

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    Only with trusted family members and then it was actually a case of gifting the vehicle rather than selling it.

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    Cyborg with a Tiara
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    I agree with FAst, especially about getting a photo of their ID.
    I would add get a good bill of sale with two signed copies, one for you, one for them.
    Cash or LOCAL BANK cashier’s check, and you could do the transaction in the parking lot of the bank to make sure it clears before you hand over the title.

    I’ve done this several times and not had any trouble using approx what fast is suggesting, both buy and sell.

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    Formerly Joedad
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    It's always good to be cautious so you don't get taken. The transfer and sale actually is through the state with papers to sign and all so it takes out lots of the stress. And most vehicles have a history so you can check things on line.

    I once sold a truck and the buyer didn't have proper proof of insurance so the truck sat on the Notary's lot until all things were properly executed. She would not let him drive it away. But that was now his problem because I had my money.

    I've only privately bought cars from trusted family members.

    Once I sold a car to a young kid with his Mom who was nuts about getting such a nice car so cheap. And it was a decent car.

    Had a buyer who wanted me to lower the price on a pickup truck. My response was that I was going to sell it as is or keep it as is. The vehicle eventually developed problems and he came back unhappy but none of it was my fault. I think the buyer thought he was getting a virtually new truck only because it looked so good.

    Good advice in the thread. Sorry to say I never had any real problems worth relating.

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    Super Moderator Bronzeage's Avatar
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    Sir,
    I wish to purchase your car automobile for my uncle. He is disabled man and need car. I have business in your city where my associate owe me debt for business. I will ask him to purchase car for uncle with cashier check he is holding for me. My friend will inspect car and if he approvals, please deposit check in your bank and give my friend balance of the car purchase.

    Thank you very much.


    The core of this scam is of course the check is a fraud, but also, you have signed over title to a car which has no connection to the transaction. Your beef is with the person who created the check and this has nothing to do with a car purchase.

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