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Thread: I've become a reluctant gun owner

  1. Top | #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Toni View Post
    Those look quite similar to guns my father owned and passed to his kids who promptly passed them to grandsons. Actually, only one grandson has any of them but another is 'promised' for 'someday' by a sibling who, for some reason (she's a hoarder and I'm not even exaggerating or being mean) wants to hold on to hers for a while. I'm not sure any have been fired since some years before he passed away. It's strange to hear them called 'antique' although I cannot say that I can tell how similar in vintage they are to the firearms my father used all the way up until about 2000 or so, mostly bird hunting. I grew up with guns in the house and come from a long line of sharp shooters and hunters. I just never cared much for killing animals so I never was interested in the guns, although back in the day, I could break one down and clean it and fire it if necessary. It's a skill I lost, quickly and voluntarily.

    Times have dramatically changed. I grew up in farm country where pretty much every relative who lived on a tiny bit of land, whether they still farmed or not, and all of their neighbors and indeed, any of the country folk I knew had a couple of rifles and a shotgun or two around, bare minimum. Gun safes were not common. Neither was kids messing with their daddies' guns. Neither was the idea that you needed a semiautomatic or high powered rifle to hunt and definitely, no one combined drinking with hunting. EVER. My dad kept his shotguns under his bed and the rifles up in his closet. It would not have been worth satisfying our curiosity if we had even thought of touching one of them unless expressly invited to do so and properly supervised by my father. Same with all the kids I knew. Heck, my father grew up basically totally unsupervised most of his childhood and judging by the stories he told (and were told about him by those who grew up with him) he was kind of a wild child. But he never, ever, ever touched one of his father's guns without express permission and never, ever, ever used one for anything other than target practice or hunting. This was frankly how half the kids I knew grew up. They knew where their dad's guns were and they never touched them, not even their own when they were old enough to have one, without express permission and any supervision their father thought necessary.

    I'm not sure what changed. But it really has.
    Interesting. I never grew up with guns. I had only seen these once or twice before my dad died. Though I knew where they were.

    In terms of farmers and guns, I see what I'd view as strong reasons why one would need one basically to protect livestock. As for semi-automatics and handguns, it's a mindset that I can't relate to.

    I used the term antiques because I've assumed, and since starting this topic have confirmed, that at least 4 of the 5 items are in fact more than 100 years old. The only one I don't yet know for sure is the shotgun which is the second photo.

    The two rifles (3rd and 4th photos) are military issue for the Spanish American War (.30-40 Krag) and WWI (Model 1903 Springfield) respectively. The Model 1903 Springfield was also used in WWII but based on the serial number I've learned it was manufactured in 1918. Both have been modified for hunting sometime before 1942.

    Like I've suggested, I'm no big fan of guns. My interest in these is primarily that they are physical artifacts from my family history, and possible estate taxes, not the guns themselves. We also have a pewter tea pot, coffee pot and milk decanter set that appear to date back to the 1700's. I'd like to know their story also.
    The shotgun is the one that looks something like what my dad had—and maybe that was from his father. Most of the farmers I knew kept guns for hunting but my grandfather and uncle used to shoot foxes (who got after chickens) and gophers (whose holes were serious hazards to the cows). In my day, coyotes were not in the area nor were wolves. Mostly they hunted. When I was young, it was rabbits and squirrels and occasionally deer. I remember when they decided to take up duck hunting but that was short lived. They moved to primarily hunting pheasant and quail. These were basically recreation/extenders to the pantry. I was an adult before I knew that those birds were rich people food. One grandfather and one uncle were held up at gun point in their own farmhouses, one in the early sixties and the other in the mid seventies.

    The pewterware sounds really interesting.

  2. Top | #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    My uncle who was visiting just after dad died says that except for a .22 that i don't think is in the photos, bullets are no longer made . And I did read something about some exception in the law for antiques. Part of the definition of antique was no commercial availability of ammunition if I recall correctly.
    That could be. A lot of "guns" from the 19th century are not legally considered to be guns.

  3. Top | #13
    Veteran Member crazyfingers's Avatar
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    Anyone interested, these people had some useful information

    http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/foru...ican-war-guns/

  4. Top | #14
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    Take them to Antiques Road Show.

    Get them appraised, they may have some value. An antiques appraiser will tell you what they are.

  5. Top | #15
    Veteran Member Ford's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    Strange though. Me having guns. There is a small box that has some ammo. I haven't touched them. Need to find out how to get rid of it.
    Maybe the ammo, but the actual firearms? I'd keep 'em.


    Their cash value would be irrelevant to me, but having that bit of family history would be far more valuable. My mother, for example, has a letter her father wrote her when he was in Italy in WWII. He was about to embark on a big offensive, and figured that maybe he wouldn't survive. So the letter told her to be strong, to listen to her older brother (who would become the "man of the house") and reminded her that he would love her always.

    It was heartbreaking to read, and his concerns were almost born out. He was wounded badly enough in that offensive that he was sent home.

    I'm sure some collector or historian would love to have it, but she insisted that when she goes, the letter is to be buried with her.

    IMO, if these are that old, then they're not just "guns." They're part of your heritage. Dispose of them as you will, but if they came to me, I'd pass them on with strict instructions to not sell them to the highest bidder.

  6. Top | #16
    Veteran Member crazyfingers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ford View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    Strange though. Me having guns. There is a small box that has some ammo. I haven't touched them. Need to find out how to get rid of it.
    Maybe the ammo, but the actual firearms? I'd keep 'em.


    Their cash value would be irrelevant to me, but having that bit of family history would be far more valuable. My mother, for example, has a letter her father wrote her when he was in Italy in WWII. He was about to embark on a big offensive, and figured that maybe he wouldn't survive. So the letter told her to be strong, to listen to her older brother (who would become the "man of the house") and reminded her that he would love her always.

    It was heartbreaking to read, and his concerns were almost born out. He was wounded badly enough in that offensive that he was sent home.

    I'm sure some collector or historian would love to have it, but she insisted that when she goes, the letter is to be buried with her.

    IMO, if these are that old, then they're not just "guns." They're part of your heritage. Dispose of them as you will, but if they came to me, I'd pass them on with strict instructions to not sell them to the highest bidder.
    Oh I am going to keep the guns as historical family artifacts. I've been working on identifying them and finding their value. I need to know what they are if I need a license or to register them and I need to know the proximate value for any estate taxes. I've made pretty good progress so far in the link I posted a few posts up.

    It's just the ammo that I want to get rid of but legally.

  7. Top | #17
    Cyborg with a Tiara
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    I just sent you a PM with info to contact someone who can help you evaluate personally via pictures you send.

    Also, for estate taxes, I believe you have to be talking HUGE amounts of money for it to be required.

  8. Top | #18
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    Also, FYI the term “antique” for a firearm apparently has legal meaning in terms of what regulations are required for transferring ownership, so that may be useful info for you.

  9. Top | #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhea View Post
    I just sent you a PM with info to contact someone who can help you evaluate personally via pictures you send.

    Also, for estate taxes, I believe you have to be talking HUGE amounts of money for it to be required.
    Federal needs a very high threshold these days but states sometimes don't.

  10. Top | #20
    Veteran Member crazyfingers's Avatar
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    The board here as been overloading. I tried to post what i newly learned today but couldn't. Now it's late but i found another gun. A Colt vest pistol with a full clip made in 1915. If u want to go to the Millitaria link above there is new info there. Later I'll post here.

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