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    Math Applied To The Real World

    Most or all of math has some actual applicator

    I do not want to appear more knowledgeable than I am, but digital cell phone communication reduces to linear algebra. A good example of applied math.

    Digital cell phone towers transmit a continuous data stream. Whenyour cell phone finds a tower a Walsh Code is transmitted to your phone. At least historically. Don't know what 5gG does.

    Your phone looks at the data stream performing a digital correlation picking out only data for your phone. It looks complicated but it reduces to multiplication and addition. Your code is continuously correlated to the data stream looking for hits.

    The codes are orthogonal, there is no leakage during correlation .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walsh_matrix

    https://www.wirelessinnovation.org/a...-1-01-chan.pdf
    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/596...f48d19348c.pdf

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    An oldie but a goody. CRC or cyclic redundancy checks. Based on polynomials.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclic_redundancy_check

    A cyclic redundancy check (CRC) is an error-detecting code commonly used in digital networks and storage devices to detect accidental changes to raw data. Blocks of data entering these systems get a short check value attached, based on the remainder of a polynomial division of their contents. On retrieval, the calculation is repeated and, in the event the check values do not match, corrective action can be taken against data corruption. CRCs can be used for error correction (see bitfilters).[1]
    CRCs are so called because the check (data verification) value is a redundancy (it expands the message without adding information) and the algorithm is based on cyclic codes. CRCs are popular because they are simple to implement in binary hardware, easy to analyze mathematically, and particularly good at detecting common errors caused by noise in transmission channels. Because the check value has a fixed length, the function that generates it is occasionally used as a hash function.
    The CRC was invented by W. Wesley Peterson in 1961; the 32-bit CRC function, used in Ethernet and many other standards, is the work of several researchers and was published in 1975.

    Introduction[edit]
    CRCs are based on the theory of cyclic error-correcting codes. The use of systematic cyclic codes, which encode messages by adding a fixed-length check value, for the purpose of error detection in communication networks, was first proposed by W. Wesley Peterson in 1961.[2] Cyclic codes are not only simple to implement but have the benefit of being particularly well suited for the detection of burst errors: contiguous sequences of erroneous data symbols in messages. This is important because burst errors are common transmission errors in many communication channels, including magnetic and optical storage devices. Typically an n-bit CRC applied to a data block of arbitrary length will detect any single error burst not longer than n bits, and the fraction of all longer error bursts that it will detect is (1 − 2−n).
    Specification of a CRC code requires definition of a so-called generator polynomial. This polynomial becomes the divisor in a polynomial long division, which takes the message as the dividend and in which the quotient is discarded and the remainder becomes the result. The important caveat is that the polynomial coefficients are calculated according to the arithmetic of a finite field, so the addition operation can always be performed bitwise-parallel (there is no carry between digits).
    In practice, all commonly used CRCs employ the Galois field of two elements, GF(2). The two elements are usually called 0 and 1, comfortably matching computer architecture.
    A CRC is called an n-bit CRC when its check value is n bits long. For a given n, multiple CRCs are possible, each with a different polynomial. Such a polynomial has highest degree n, which means it has n + 1 terms. In other words, the polynomial has a length of n + 1; its encoding requires n + 1 bits. Note that most polynomial specifications either drop the MSB or LSB, since they are always 1. The CRC and associated polynomial typically have a name of the form CRC-n-XXX as in the table below.
    The simplest error-detection system, the parity bit, is in fact a 1-bit CRC: it uses the generator polynomial x + 1 (two terms), and has the name CRC-1.
    Application[edit]
    A CRC-enabled device calculates a short, fixed-length binary sequence, known as the check value or CRC, for each block of data to be sent or stored and appends it to the data, forming a codeword.
    When a codeword is received or read, the device either compares its check value with one freshly calculated from the data block, or equivalently, performs a CRC on the whole codeword and compares the resulting check value with an expected residue constant.
    If the CRC values do not match, then the block contains a data error.
    The device may take corrective action, such as rereading the block or requesting that it be sent again. Otherwise, the data is assumed to be error-free (though, with some small probability, it may contain undetected errors; this is inherent in the nature of error-checking).[3]

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    Learn so,etching new every day. From the CRC link. The formal basis of binary arithmetic, addition and multiplication.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finite_field_arithmetic

    In mathematics, finite field arithmetic is arithmetic in a finite field (a field containing a finite number of elements) as opposed to arithmetic in a field with an infinite number of elements, like the field of rational numbers.

    While no finite field is infinite, there are infinitely many different finite fields. Their number of elements is necessarily of the form pn where p is a prime number and n is a positive integer, and two finite fields of the same size are isomorphic. The prime p is called the characteristic of the field, and the positive integer n is called the dimension of the field over its prime field.

    Finite fields are used in a variety of applications, including in classical coding theory in linear block codes such as BCH codes and Reed–Solomon error correction, in cryptography algorithms such as the Rijndael (AES) encryption algorithm, in tournament scheduling, and in the design of experiments.

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