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Thread: "Coronavirus and the US" or "We are all going to die!!!!"

  1. Top | #851
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
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    How to Read a Coronavirus Study, or Any Science Paper - The New York Times
    A lot of people are reading scientific papers for the first time these days, hoping to make sense of the coronavirus pandemic. If you’re one of them, be advised the scientific paper is a peculiar literary genre that can take some getting used to. And also bear in mind that these are not typical times for scientific publishing.

    It is hard to think of another moment in history when so many scientists turned their attention to one subject with such speed.
    Then the very fast growth of research into this virus. From a few papers in mid-January to over 50 papers by the end of January to a much larger number more recently. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) lists 17,000 published papers, and a preprint archive called bioRxiv contains about 4,000 papers.

    The first scientific papers read more like letters among friends, recounting hobbies and oddities. The first issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, published on May 30, 1667, included brief dispatches with titles such as “An account of the improvement of optick glasses,” and “An account of a very odd monstrous calf.”

    ...
    Along the way, scientific papers also developed a distinctive narrative arc. A paper published in Philosophical Transactions today is no longer a gossipy letter, but a four-part story. Papers typically open with some history, giving a justification for the new research they contain. The authors then lay out the methods they used to carry out that research — how they eavesdropped on lions, how they measured chemicals in Martian dust. Then the papers present results, followed by a discussion of what those results mean. Scientists will typically point out the shortcomings in their own research and offer ideas for new studies to see if their interpretations hold water.

  2. Top | #852
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    Quote Originally Posted by lpetrich View Post
    A propos of which, 15 of the 20 worst affected Brazilian cities (in terms of accumulated deaths per 100,000 inhabitants) are in the (tropical) North region: https://g1.globo.com/bemestar/corona...de-junho.ghtml

    Or that's what I gather from this Portuguese: "Das 20 cidades com maior mortalidade no Brasil, 15 estão na Região Norte."

  3. Top | #853
    Formerly Joedad
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    Quote Originally Posted by lpetrich View Post
    In certain situations but not always. I see people working in their back yards and they're wearing a mask. That is not necessary. I think it makes them feel safer, or maybe keeps them from touching their faces, keeps them reminded of the danger, but a mask in your own back yard when no one else is around is not necessary.

  4. Top | #854
    Contributor blastula's Avatar
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  5. Top | #855
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.G.G. Moogly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by lpetrich View Post
    In certain situations but not always. I see people working in their back yards and they're wearing a mask. That is not necessary. I think it makes them feel safer, or maybe keeps them from touching their faces, keeps them reminded of the danger, but a mask in your own back yard when no one else is around is not necessary.
    Agreed. I don't wear a mask for yardwork.

    On the other hand, mask compliance on the hiking trails seems to be about zero and even on the weekdays the parking lots are full. Hiking is going to have to wait until it cools off enough that I can just head out into a random piece of public land and see what's out there. (Now the only way to not melt is the mountain and if you're not on a trail there you're liable to hit uncrossable terrain.)

  6. Top | #856
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    Tracking COVID-19 case growth. Right now you go to Wiki and you check out states you see the total number of cases and a percentage for the daily increase. But while this makes sense at the beginning of an outbreak, especially with a bug that last as long as SARS-CoV-2, shouldn't the percentage increase be based on the total existing number of cases and not the total number of cases which includes those that have recovered?

    This would have a notable change on the perceived growth rate.

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