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Thread: Implementing Medicare for All

  1. Top | #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by lpetrich View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
    Plenty of people in Canada can't find a primary care doctor.
    Evidence: {}
    Per usual, Loren is being deliberately disingenuous. There is an issue with rural Canadians not being able to find a primary care doctor, but it's because of where they live geographically, not due to socialized medicine or the like.

  2. Top | #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiprHead View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel View Post

    Plenty of people in Canada can't find a primary care doctor.
    Citation please.
    A bit old but I haven't heard that it's gotten any better:

    https://www.fraserinstitute.org/arti...-coming-decade

  3. Top | #63
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
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    The One State Taking a Big Run at Health Reform - POLITICO
    When Eileen Cody, the most senior Democrat in Washington state's House of Representatives, arrived in Olympia this year for the start of the legislative session, she knew health care reform would be at the very top of the agenda.

    Although Washington had embraced the Medicaid expansion under Obamacare, the state was still reeling under double-digit insurance premium increases and a depressingly large number of uninsured residents. For years, the Legislature had been too divided to push through a meaningful policy fix. But 2018's blue-wave elections had given Democrats large majorities in the Statehouse, and many members were eager to use that political capital to do something big in health care.

    Just how big was made clear to Cody at the first meeting of her new caucus. Standing before the 56 new and returning members in the party's main chambers, Cody took a quick poll. "How many of you guys all think ‘Medicare for All’ is a good idea?” Cody recalls asking. "And they all raised their hands."
    States like Vermont, Colorado, and California have had some consideration of public options, and even M4A, without success. A public option was dropped from Obamacare in 2010.
    Last May, after five months of legislative wrangling, Cody got her public option over the line, making Washington the first state in the country to provide a state-sponsored health care plan and putting Washington state squarely at the center of the national debate over health care reform.
    With a public option. It would compete with the medical-insurance companies rather than replacing them, and thus be much less disruptive. Joe Biden likes it, and Elizabeth Warren and AOC both consider it a good steppingstone to M4A.

    The law was much weaker than what its authors had hoped for.
    When the law goes into effect in 2021, the actual savings projected for Washington enrollees might be barely a sixth of what Democrats were hoping for at the start of the session. And, crucially, even those modest results assume insurers, doctors and hospitals will participate in what is essentially a voluntary program—hardly a certainty, given how bitterly many of them opposed it in the Legislature.
    Cost containment is the problem - it was loudly objected to by those who benefit from uncontained costs. They settled on a reimbursement rate of 160% that of Medicare. With it that high, it is expected to give cost savings between 5% and 10%. There is also the problem that it may not get many hospitals and other providers signed up for it.
    Cody is more direct: Warren’s plan would “never get the votes." It’s likely that few state legislators were surprised when Warren recently shifted from a full-scale Medicare for All plan to one that’s more incremental, calling for implementing a public option first followed by bigger reform over three years.

    In fact, for Cody, the need to shift to a more incremental strategy is one of the key lessons to emerge from Washington's public option experience. In her view, something as complex and massive and ubiquitous as the health care system can't be fixed all at once, no matter how energized your caucus is.

  4. Top | #64
    Loony Running The Asylum ZiprHead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ZiprHead View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel View Post

    Plenty of people in Canada can't find a primary care doctor.
    Citation please.
    A bit old but I haven't heard that it's gotten any better:

    https://www.fraserinstitute.org/arti...-coming-decade
    Factual Reporting: MIXED
    Country: Canada
    World Press Freedom Rank: Canada 18/180

    History

    Founded in 1974, The Fraser Institute is a Canadian public policy think tank and registered charity. It has been described as politically conservative and libertarian. The Institute is headquartered in Vancouver, with offices also located in Calgary, Toronto, and Montreal, and ties to a global network of 80 think-tanks through the Economic Freedom Network.
    When it comes to science the Fraser Institute does not support the consensus of science through the publication of stories that are false or misleading. For example, in this article (Climate Policy Implications of the Hiatus in Global Warming) they make the false claim that global warming has not increased significantly since 1998. This year is frequently cherry picked due to it being the warmest year on record at that time, and has been debunked for years. Other articles on the website also minimize the impacts climate change.

    Overall, we rate Fraser Institute strongly Right-Center biased based on policy positions that favors business and Mixed for factual reporting due to false and misleading claims regarding global warming. (D. Van Zandt 9/9/2017) Updated (7/20/2019)
    https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/fraser-institute/
    When conservatives realize they cannot win democratically, they will not abandon conservatism. They will abandon democracy.

  5. Top | #65
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    And, as noted in my previous post, completely contradicted by the actual facts. The number of doctors in Canada has gone increasingly up over the past few decades.

    The issue isn't number of doctors; it's number of doctors that don't live in extreme/rural areas. But as the study referred to in the above piece shows, there are already ways to incentivize within the system:

    Since the introduction of the public medical care system in the 1960s, most physicians in Canada have been compensated through FFS ["fee-for-service"] payments. Alternative payment plan (APP) programs first became prevalent in the mid-1990s and have become an increasingly popular method of remuneration to physicians in the last 2 decades. Payments through alternative methods have shown a slight decrease from nearly 30% of total clinical payments in 2012–2013 to 27.4% in 2017–2018.

    Alternative methods of paying physicians include salaries, sessional and hourly rates, capitation models and contract-based payments. Many physicians receive compensation through multiple models, which could include both FFS and alternative payments; however, funding through the different payment models varies significantly across jurisdictions.

  6. Top | #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koyaanisqatsi View Post
    The issue isn't number of doctors; it's number of doctors that don't live in extreme/rural areas.
    Which is a problem in the USA as well.

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