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Thread: Amazon Troubles

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    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
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    Amazon Troubles

    Jeffrey Stein on Twitter: "🚨🚨🚨🚨Tim Bray, vice president of Amazon, quits over company "firing whistleblowers who were making noise about warehouse employees frightened of Covid-19."
    Bray calls Amazon "chickenshit" for firing workers who organized protests https://t.co/9AdUyzwO4f" / Twitter

    noting
    Amazon VP Resigns, Calls Company ‘Chickenshit’ for Firing Protesting Workers - VICE
    Tim Bray, a well known senior engineer and Vice President at Amazon has “quit in dismay” because Amazon has been “firing whistleblowers who were making noise about warehouse employees frightened of Covid-19.” In an open letter on his website, Bray, who has worked at the company for nearly six years, called the company “chickenshit” for firing and disparaging employees who have organized protests. He also said the firings are "designed to create a climate of fear."

    Amazon’s strategy throughout the coronavirus crisis has been to fire dissenters and disparage them both in the press and behind closed doors. There have been dozens of confirmed coronavirus cases at warehouses around the country, and workers have repeatedly said the company isn’t doing enough to protect them. Last week, Amazon ended a program that allowed workers to take unlimited unpaid time off if they fear getting sick from the coronavirus. Last Friday, Amazon workers together with Target, FedEx, Instacart, and Whole Foods workers, went on strike to protest their working conditions.
    More on that strike:
    Amazon, Instacart, Target, and FedEx Workers Explain Why They're Striking - VICE
    Today, May Day, thousands of frontline workers at Amazon, Instacart, Whole Foods, Target, and FedEx have organized a historic strike to protest working conditions and demand worker protections at these companies, which have all seen revenues skyrocket during the coronavirus pandemic.

    Striking workers say they have formed an "alliance" to help save the lives of workers and communities who have faced increased workloads and unprecedented dangers in the wake of the pandemic. They are asking customers to boycott these companies during the strike. Almost uniformly, the companies they work for have retaliated against workers or refused to meet their demands, which include guaranteed paid sick leave, personal protective equipment such as masks and hand sanitizer, and hazard pay.
    Amazon Warehouse Workers Are Abandoning Their Jobs in Droves - VICE
    Lasting for more than a year as an Amazon warehouse employee is notoriously difficult. Some workers walk up to 15 miles a shift, while others pack hundreds of boxes an hour—moving in repetitive, forceful positions that lead to frequent—and sometimes lifelong— injuries to shoulders, necks, backs, wrists and knees. Worse yet, Amazon is known to track and fire workers for lack of “efficiency.”
    Amazon has unusually high turnover rates by warehouse-industry standards.
    Between 2011—the year the first fulfillment center opened in California— and 2017, the turnover rate in five counties with Amazon warehouses leaped from 38 percent to 100 percent, according to the report. In other words, more warehouse workers departed from their jobs each year in counties with an Amazon presence than the total number of warehouse jobs.

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    Elder Contributor DBT's Avatar
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    You'd think that a company like Amazon would be more progressive with their pay and conditions, but maybe that's reserved for the higher classes, perhaps middle management and up.

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    the baby-eater
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    Following a link, I found this interesting:

    Amazon-owned Whole Foods is quietly tracking its employees with a heat map tool that ranks which stores are most at risk of unionizing
    https://www.businessinsider.com.au/w...20-1?r=US&IR=T

    Whole Foods’ heat map says lower rates of racial diversity increase unionization risks

    The second group of metrics in the scoring system, called store risks, aren’t a direct cause of risk “but can predispose a store to risk,” according to documents.

    Store-risk metrics include average store compensation, average total store sales, and a “diversity index” that represents the racial and ethnic diversity of every store. Stores at higher risk of unionizing have lower diversity and lower employee compensation, as well as higher total store sales and higher rates of workers’ compensation claims, according to the documents.
    I'm going to speculate on a possible reason for this: people don't really mix with other ethnicities as much as they do with their own. In a diverse workplace, this makes it harder to develop the kind of trust and solidarity with one another required to collectively risk your jobs for a better deal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBT View Post
    You'd think that a company like Amazon would be more progressive with their pay and conditions, but maybe that's reserved for the higher classes, perhaps middle management and up.
    Why would you think that? Amazon is hardly known as progressive, indeed, this is entirely living up to their reputation.

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    Elder Contributor DBT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J842P View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DBT View Post
    You'd think that a company like Amazon would be more progressive with their pay and conditions, but maybe that's reserved for the higher classes, perhaps middle management and up.
    Why would you think that? Amazon is hardly known as progressive, indeed, this is entirely living up to their reputation.
    If Amazon is looking to build a bad reputation, fine, it is working.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by J842P View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DBT View Post
    You'd think that a company like Amazon would be more progressive with their pay and conditions, but maybe that's reserved for the higher classes, perhaps middle management and up.
    Why would you think that? Amazon is hardly known as progressive, indeed, this is entirely living up to their reputation.
    If Amazon is looking to build a bad reputation, fine, it is working.
    I was just asking why you thought that about Amazon, it's sort of notorious for being shitty. It has been for a while.

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    Elder Contributor DBT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J842P View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DBT View Post

    If Amazon is looking to build a bad reputation, fine, it is working.
    I was just asking why you thought that about Amazon, it's sort of notorious for being shitty. It has been for a while.
    I guess that I just expected something better from them, if only for the sake of public image. But I was wrong.

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    Content Thief Elixir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by J842P View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DBT View Post

    If Amazon is looking to build a bad reputation, fine, it is working.
    I was just asking why you thought that about Amazon, it's sort of notorious for being shitty. It has been for a while.
    I guess that I just expected something better from them, if only for the sake of public image. But I was wrong.
    Bezos don't need no steenkin' public image. He fucking OWNS the public.

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