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Thread: Your experiences traveling with kids

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    My Brane Hertz spikepipsqueak's Avatar
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    Unamerican person rearing ugly head.
    My Brane Hertz

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    Mazzie Daius fromderinside's Avatar
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    'merican here. I like spikepipaqueak's description. They mirror those of this 'mercan's experiences of trips through Montana and Wyoming. Burma Shave y'see'nsay. Cars and road kill y'count'nplay.

    Loren Pechtel people not from Bundy land you discount?

  3. Top | #13
    Deus Meumque Jus
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    Quote Originally Posted by spikepipsqueak View Post
    Read all the thread, but read Bronzeage and Rhea's posts twice.

    When my 2 are with their Dad he instantly puts on a movie and they miss some interesting stuff out of the window. When they are with me I talk to them as I drive and point stuff out. I think that's better, only time will tell what the kids think (when they have some of their own).

    When my son was tiny I could travel in hot weather with a supply of nappies and not much else, because he was breastfed.

    Do you know the rules of car cricket?
    I recall growing up doing similar on our journeys to Myrtle Beach, Tennessee, and Florida. I'm not sure where they came from but we were given activity books that included 'looking out the window' games. One of them was to find all the US state license plates.

    I like the idea as I'd like to raise kids who are viscerally connected with the real world - technology as a tool, not completely dominating their reality.

  4. Top | #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by fromderinside View Post
    'merican here. I like spikepipaqueak's description. They mirror those of this 'mercan's experiences of trips through Montana and Wyoming. Burma Shave y'see'nsay. Cars and road kill y'count'nplay.

    Loren Pechtel people not from Bundy land you discount?
    I was joking. It said "cricket"

  5. Top | #15
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    As a kid, my family made several long haul trips, once to Washington DC and a few to the Miami, FL area --which included at various times, camping in the keys (do not tent camp in FL--from someone who spent her childhood weekends in a tent) and Disney World. This was pre-seat belt days, 4 kids, a station wagon (or the trips I remember we had a station wagon by then) and no bathroom breaks until one of my parents had to go or took pity because youngest sibling was 8 years younger than me so 'little' meaning needing more bathroom breaks. No complaining was allowed--although none of us was actually hit for fighting or complaining because basically, we knew the threats would be followed by swift action. No DVDs, no cds, just whatever radio came on if Dad was in the mood. LOTS of looking out the windows, playing car games, and singing songs. I'm sure I read a lot as well because for the most part, if I was sitting anywhere not at the dinner table, a book was in my hand. I really loved watching the landscape go by, noting the differences in terrain, trees, farmlands, even the difference in the color of the soil.

    As an adult, I always lived anywhere from 250 miles from my parents' homes to close to 800 miles, at always at least 500 miles from my inlaws. We made at least annual trips to see The Family (both sides) every summer and sometimes a pre-holiday visit, depending on when the actual dates fell and school calendars. Because we did not have much money, this ALWAYS meant going by car. First trip, our oldest was about 5 months old and we were taking him to meet his grandparents (both sides, 250 miles away from each other) over the holidays. He was a real trooper, mostly breast fed but also accepting formula as I was back at work 7 weeks after he was born and we couldn't afford a breast pump. Second child: we continued the trips over the summers but holidays were getting difficult as it was hard to manage both families in that short a time period and it was hard to alternate families. Since my parents were divorced, visiting my family involved splitting time between my mother's too small and very overcrowded home and my father's home with whoever he was married to at the time. Not always fun, as we added kids. Expectations were more rigid. Inlaws were easier because they had more room and were more relaxed about having us and my MIL really relished the stereotypical grandmother role.

    Later, as kids moved into teen years and summer jobs and summer sports, it was harder to manage these trips, especially when I was working full time and had little time off. Trips became more sporadic.

    The kids were all good travelers and good sports about being expected to adjust to vastly different diets (during their childhoods, we were vegetarians and neither family was either vegetarian or interested in making even a tiny adaptation in their own dietary norms) and schedules and expectations. Again, all pre-devices era, so it was playing with small toys, games, books, stories, looking at the landscape, etc. One kid had a 3-4 year period when on any family vacation, he would be car sick within an hour of home. We still cannot figure that one out as the trips all started out on very familiar roads that we traveled routinely and he never had an issue on those trips. Just those few years when, at some point, we were going to have to pull over, and he was going to puke and then we would continue onwards.

    Our oldest was born when hubby was in grad school so we really had no money. I mean no money. One year, my sister decided the family Christmas present would be two tickets plus child to visit home over Christmas holiday (not the BIg Day itself). Hubby wasn't able to go so it was just me and firstborn, flying out together. He was about 2 and a half, a real trooper, proud of his 'wings' handed out by the flight attendants. We were truly fortunate in having him as our first born as he was a natural born flirt and very outgoing so he was happy to chatter with the flight attendants and other passengers and smart enough to find other targets if anyone seemed disinterested. Honestly, he was the world's easiest kid--which was good because we were such young, idiot parents.

    I am not certain why our trips went so well--whether it was simply our assurance that they would go well and the kids would behave and we'd stop when anyone needed a bathroom break (unlike the strict rules with my father). We never even had to threaten to pull the car over if anyone was getting a bit too rambunctious. Maybe my parental backwards in time gazing glasses are very rose tinted and the kids remember things differently. Maybe the kids were just unusually good at traveling? IDK, to be honest. I will say that we stopped trying to visit over the holidays after one visit where, on the 500 mile trip home from my inlaws, we discovered--the hard way-- that my brother in law had likely been telling the truth about having a stomach bug and was not merely sleeping off a hangover. Not a fun trip home.

    One thing that my family noted is that although they only saw them once or maybe twice a year, the kids always knew them as family and never acted like they were strangers or strange (and to be honest, some things were a little strange). Until a couple years after our youngest was born, our kids were the only grandchildren on either side of the family so they really had the chance to soak up a lot of attention. By the time my eldest niece was born, the oldest was starting into the summer sports/ summer job phase of his life and it was increasingly difficult to manage to get everybody in the car to go anywhere. My nieces all take after their mothers and tend to be much more shy and introverted than even my own shy/introverted child who , as an adult tells me that they recognized in their very quiet aunt and cousin a kindred spirit. But we traveled as a pack so they were never the odd ones out and remained in their comfort zone.

  6. Top | #16
    Mazzie Daius fromderinside's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loren Pechtel View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by fromderinside View Post
    'merican here. I like spikepipaqueak's description. They mirror those of this 'mercan's experiences of trips through Montana and Wyoming. Burma Shave y'see'nsay. Cars and road kill y'count'nplay.

    Loren Pechtel people not from Bundy land you discount?
    I was joking. It said "cricket"
    I'm not. You come from the land of baseball, cricket sped up. And because the players are americans they


    are soo stupid.


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