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Thread: Covid-19 miscellany

  1. Top | #1291
    Contributor DrZoidberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jokodo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrZoidberg View Post

    It's because they've absolutely bungled the rollout of it. They're failing to get the older and and at risks to get vaccinated. Due to shit communication. So they've opened up for the general population. Just to avoid slack at the vaccination centres. So far the Swedish vaccination centres have had zero queue. Way more staff than patients. Because the patience haven't managed to find their way to the centres, even when they're eligible.

    Denmark on the other hand are vaccinating people with the efficiency of a McDonalds slaughterhouse. Everybody knows where to be and when. Queues are kept constant and short. It's a beauty to behold.

    It's interesting to contrast these two systems. Two radically different ways of doing it. Denmark is centrally planned in a way that would make Mao proud. Sweden has no central planning in a way that would make Johnny Rotten proud.

    I'm a systems theorist. It's my university degree. Generally non-centrally planned methods of distribution tends to be better. Because each node in the distribution network can adapt to local needs. But you need to think it through first, so that the incentives encourage the wanted behaviour. If you mix central planning and free distribution in a haphazard manner with shit communication and unclear rules your system will break down. Which is what has happened in Sweden.

    Denmark is planned fully top down. Which is extremely hard to get right. But they did it.

    The moral of the story is that sometimes communism works. Who knew?
    So you're trying to benefit from Sweden's failure to devise and implement sensible rules who gets vaccinated when, by getting a jab now even though by any sensible priority there should be 4 more million people ahead of you in the queue - but can't do so because they fail even at failing?
    I'm trying to be a good citizen and get my jab when it's my alloted turn. I'd never skip ahead in the line.

  2. Top | #1292
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrZoidberg View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jokodo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrZoidberg View Post

    It's because they've absolutely bungled the rollout of it. They're failing to get the older and and at risks to get vaccinated. Due to shit communication. So they've opened up for the general population. Just to avoid slack at the vaccination centres. So far the Swedish vaccination centres have had zero queue. Way more staff than patients. Because the patience haven't managed to find their way to the centres, even when they're eligible.

    Denmark on the other hand are vaccinating people with the efficiency of a McDonalds slaughterhouse. Everybody knows where to be and when. Queues are kept constant and short. It's a beauty to behold.

    It's interesting to contrast these two systems. Two radically different ways of doing it. Denmark is centrally planned in a way that would make Mao proud. Sweden has no central planning in a way that would make Johnny Rotten proud.

    I'm a systems theorist. It's my university degree. Generally non-centrally planned methods of distribution tends to be better. Because each node in the distribution network can adapt to local needs. But you need to think it through first, so that the incentives encourage the wanted behaviour. If you mix central planning and free distribution in a haphazard manner with shit communication and unclear rules your system will break down. Which is what has happened in Sweden.

    Denmark is planned fully top down. Which is extremely hard to get right. But they did it.

    The moral of the story is that sometimes communism works. Who knew?
    So you're trying to benefit from Sweden's failure to devise and implement sensible rules who gets vaccinated when, by getting a jab now even though by any sensible priority there should be 4 more million people ahead of you in the queue - but can't do so because they fail even at failing?
    I'm trying to be a good citizen and get my jab when it's my alloted turn. I'd never skip ahead in the line.
    I was joking!

  3. Top | #1293
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    Quote Originally Posted by southernhybrid View Post
    I've known some bitchy nurses but as I said earlier, nurses tend to abuse each other far more than they abuse or mistreat their patients.
    I've seen too many that won't go get somebody better when my wife warns them she's a very hard stick. (She doesn't have any bleeding disorders but the average nurse is likely to bruise her on a blood draw.)

  4. Top | #1294
    Super Moderator crazyfingers's Avatar
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    A co-worker in Germany sent me this chart today. I don't know the source but she uses only reputable sources. Nor do I know when the chart was created. This is related to our work as we research and consult on the demand for office technology products and clearly getting covid under control impacts the demand for office technology products. Lots of uncertainty remains on when, how many and how people with return to working in potentially changed office environment.

    US and European vaccine hesitancy/acceptance rates.


  5. Top | #1295
    Contributor repoman's Avatar
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    So what treatments for covid work that are NOT new, expensive and patentable?

  6. Top | #1296
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    Dexamethasone

  7. Top | #1297
    Veteran Member none's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by untermensche View Post
    Dexamethasone
    or swallow blue whale sperm.

  8. Top | #1298
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    A co-worker in Germany sent me this chart today. I don't know the source but she uses only reputable sources. Nor do I know when the chart was created. This is related to our work as we research and consult on the demand for office technology products and clearly getting covid under control impacts the demand for office technology products. Lots of uncertainty remains on when, how many and how people with return to working in potentially changed office environment.

    US and European vaccine hesitancy/acceptance rates.

    Well, some things never change...

    About 300 years ago, Britain was the first Western European country to pick up variolation, a precursor to vaccination where they would infect a patient with small pox under controlled conditions, and preferably with a less vigorous strain, to give him immunity without a bad case. The practice wasn't invented in England, it had previously been used in a wide range of places outside Catholic/Protestant Europe, from the Caucasus via Greece, parts of Africa all the way to India, but the Brits became the first Westerners to pick it up after hearing about it from Constantinople/Istanbul. While of course not as safe as modern vaccines, the practice was amazingly effective when done right.

    France became the last holdout of scepticism, intermittently even banning variolation, until some 50 years later.

    Here's the first detailed English language account, an extract from a letter by a Greek-Italian physician who had encountered the practice in Constantinople to his English colleague, dated 1714: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/d...rstl.1714.0010
    Last edited by Jokodo; 05-07-2021 at 11:06 AM.

  9. Top | #1299
    Veteran Member none's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jokodo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    A co-worker in Germany sent me this chart today. I don't know the source but she uses only reputable sources. Nor do I know when the chart was created. This is related to our work as we research and consult on the demand for office technology products and clearly getting covid under control impacts the demand for office technology products. Lots of uncertainty remains on when, how many and how people with return to working in potentially changed office environment.

    US and European vaccine hesitancy/acceptance rates.

    Well, some things never change...

    About 300 years ago, Britain was the first Western European country to pick up variolation, a precursor to vaccination where they would infect a patient with small pox under controlled conditions, and preferably with a less vigorous strain, to give him immunity without a bad case. The practice wasn't invented in England, it had previously been used in a wide range of places outside Catholic/Protestant Europe, from the Caucasus via Greece, parts of Africa all the way to India, but the Brits became the first Westerners to pick it up after hearing about it from Constantinople/Istanbul. While of course not as safe as modern vaccines, the practice was amazingly effective when done right.

    France became the last holdout of scepticism, intermittently even banning variolation, until some 50 years later.

    Here's the first English language account, an extract from a letter by a Greek-Italian physician who had encountered the practice in Constantinople to his English colleague, dated 1714: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/d...rstl.1714.0010
    engrish?

  10. Top | #1300
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    Quote Originally Posted by none View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jokodo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    A co-worker in Germany sent me this chart today. I don't know the source but she uses only reputable sources. Nor do I know when the chart was created. This is related to our work as we research and consult on the demand for office technology products and clearly getting covid under control impacts the demand for office technology products. Lots of uncertainty remains on when, how many and how people with return to working in potentially changed office environment.

    US and European vaccine hesitancy/acceptance rates.

    Well, some things never change...

    About 300 years ago, Britain was the first Western European country to pick up variolation, a precursor to vaccination where they would infect a patient with small pox under controlled conditions, and preferably with a less vigorous strain, to give him immunity without a bad case. The practice wasn't invented in England, it had previously been used in a wide range of places outside Catholic/Protestant Europe, from the Caucasus via Greece, parts of Africa all the way to India, but the Brits became the first Westerners to pick it up after hearing about it from Constantinople/Istanbul. While of course not as safe as modern vaccines, the practice was amazingly effective when done right.

    France became the last holdout of scepticism, intermittently even banning variolation, until some 50 years later.

    Here's the first English language account, an extract from a letter by a Greek-Italian physician who had encountered the practice in Constantinople to his English colleague, dated 1714: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/d...rstl.1714.0010
    engrish?
    Yes, they talked funny in 1714. What else is new?

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