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Thread: What were the 70s and 80s like for you?

  1. Top | #31
    Elder Contributor barbos's Avatar
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    Well, in Soviet Union they thought US would attack because Brezhnev died. Not because of some real tensions which ordinary people knew nothing about.

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    Veteran Member funinspace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by barbos View Post
    I remember standing guard in school near portrait of Brezhnev after he died
    Everybody thought America would attack Soviet Union.
    I myself was not convinced America even existed. I thought it could be just fiction, nobody I knew has ever been there.

    What else? School was a drag especially these celebrations/demonstrations when children had to learn to march in formations. Now, I can't believe how these teachers (99% women) could really believe and more importantly do all that crap without laughing.
    Yeah, everyone in the UK in 1983 thought the US would attack the Soviet Union, or vice versa, probably by mistake, and we would be obliterated in the crossfire. I lived fairly close to the USAF listening station at Menwith Hill, which was expected to be a priority target, so even a limited exchange would have been pretty bad for everyone I knew.

    That WWIII really did nearly happen by accident a few times during the 1980s doesn't surprise me, but I am frankly glad I didn't know how close it got. It was worrying enough as it was.
    I grew up near a bunch of these, if WWIII came, we'd be vaporized in about 3 seconds, 5 times over:



    I guess it kind of just got to the point growing up that crawling under our desks was kind of a joke as an exercise. The whole threat seemed more of something from SciFi than anything else...

  3. Top | #33
    Sapere aude Politesse's Avatar
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    Which is funny 'cause, you know, the threat of nuclear annihilation is very much still there. I am uncomfortable about how close we apparently came to deploying nuclear weapons during the last administration. We're just not preparing kids for the realities of nuclear war anymore like we used to..
    "Banish me from Eden when you will, but first let me eat of the tree of knowledge."

  4. Top | #34
    Elder Contributor barbos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Politesse View Post
    Which is funny 'cause, you know, the threat of nuclear annihilation is very much still there. I am uncomfortable about how close we apparently came to deploying nuclear weapons during the last administration. We're just not preparing kids for the realities of nuclear war anymore like we used to..
    Yeah, nuking Covid19 and hurricanes was a bad Idea.

  5. Top | #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tharmas View Post
    The first half of the seventies were an extension of the sixties, at least for me. Political turmoil (Vietnam War still going on, Watergate and Nixon, Patty Hurst, etc.). Drugs, sex and Rock n’ Roll was still the mantra. I was living in Canada at the time, and have some strong memories and stories to tell about the Canadian reaction to US politics. Pierre Trudeau seemed like the hippest head of state imaginable, except I was living in BC, where the archaic Social Credit Party still had control.

    Things settled down politically in the US with Jimmy Carter as POTUS. There was tremendous inflation. Interest rates were 13-15% for a mortgage, IIRC. Then the eighties. Reagan became POTUS. In many ways he was as corrupt as Trump. For instance it was pretty clear he had made a pre-election secret deal with Iran to kill the negotiations with Carter about the hostages. The Democrats couldn’t get any traction on that issue though, and barely got convictions on the Iran-Contra deal. Americans in general loved Reagan for some reason. Most won’t believe you still today if you point out that in terms of felony convictions alone, Reagan’s administration was the most corrupt in the late twentieth century.
    in my 20s for most of the 70s and in my 30s for most of the 80s:
    70s: sex, yes please, and lots of it; drugs--except for caffeine, I just said no; rock 'n roll: dies out during this decade--revived somewhat singlehandedly by Springsteen. I disliked disco and heavy metal and the Carpenters/ most "easy listening"--(as a young gay man) I felt both free and yet somewhat constrained and also wired up--all that caffeine, perhaps. People became somewhat more self-absorbed then in the 60s: Saw Ian & Sylvia, The Band, Crosby Stills & Nash, Dylan's Rolling Thunder Express, Bob Seger (wow!), Rod Stewart, the Persuasions, Loudon Wainwright, Joni Mitchell in concert. Began reading Margaret Atwood, Doris Lessing, V. S. Naipaul, Thomas Pynchon, Iris Murdoch. Also read Maria Campbell's Halfbreed and John Rechy's City of Night, which took nearly 30 years until I was experienced enough to get it--originally I felt a fascinated repulsion. Songs of the decade: the Kinks "Lola", Aretha Franklin's "Spanish Harlem" & "Spirit in the Dark", Neil Young's "Tonight's the Night"; Pointer sisters, "Fire", Loran bennet's "Breakfast in Bed" Movies, Cries and Whispers, , Alien, Dog Day Afternoon, Monty Python and the Holy Grail
    80s: burgeoning of cable t. v. got my first laptop towards end of decade; working on computers at work before then; AIDS--the current pandemic had me singing along in my head to Springsteen's 'Street of Philadelphia"--one felt like a stranger to oneself, and every particular physical twinge was anxiously monitored as a possible precursor; neo-cons galore--an even more self-centred decade than the 70s. Was the least ageist period during my lifetime--elderly people in movies and on t. v. got worse in the decades after. Saw Springsteen, Aretha Franklin (wow!), Etta James (twice), Leonard Cohen, Bette Midler (twice--but the second time may have been in the early 90s) in concert. Saw Thompson Highway's Dry Lips Oughta Move to Kapuskasing in performance, and began reading his other work. songs of the decade: Eurythmics, "Sweet Dreams are Made of This"; Leonard Cohen, "The Night Comes On"; Bette Midler, "Beast of Burden" as performed on Johnny Carson; Joni Mitchell, "Cool Water"; Eddy Grant, "Electric Avenue": Movies, Do the Right Thing, "Women in the Edge of a Nervous Breakdown", "Marianne and Juliane"

  6. Top | #36
    Veteran Member TV and credit cards's Avatar
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    The late sixties/early seventies were a cultural period that can hardly be separated.
    I remember my mom asking my dad if she could start wearing pantsuits. After all, she was a working woman now. I remember my brother (eight years my senior) getting a loud lecture from my dad while he removed the US flag patch from the bottom of his bell bottom jeans he had sewn there. I remember my first transistor radio. Dialing a three digit number on the phone to get the correct time or the weather forecast. Riding my banana bike everywhere. Going to the drive-in theater with my friend and his parents in their AMC Javelin. We saw Willard, The Legend of Billy Jack, Cat o’ Nine Tails. Another friend’s father who owned a new Camaro convertible, riding in the back with the top down going over the bridge by NASA. Felt like we were doing 100 mph. His grandfather owned a local race track. My dad had a mid sixties Mustang. My brother destroyed the transmission. At the time, even I knew he was lying when he said he didn’t know what happened. My sister had a pen pal from Germany. I remember her getting a copy of Match magazine. Some of the pictures were quite racy. I spent many a summer days building a fort in the woods. And fooling around with my sister’s best friend there.
    The seventies was music and more music. I remember listening to Wolfman Jack on mom’s console stereo. It was filled with her Abba and Tom Jones albums. My brother had plenty of albums I wasn’t to touch, when he was home. In middle school many of us wore jean jackets with various rock band names inked on the back. This required your best artwork. Mine was exceptional, of course. Many kids prominently displayed Kiss in the upper center. I never liked Kiss. Thought they were a clown show with bad music. I think I was just getting into Yes at this time. I hated when disco came around. I felt it was killing rock. Then Pink Floyd put out The Wall and I was born again. Then MTV. A lot of MTV. Then I had to grow up.

  7. Top | #37
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    Drive in movies were a great experience for a kid.

    For an adult probably not all that exciting.

    They were dead by the time I was an adult.

    Cable television and HBO and VCR's killed them.

  8. Top | #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Politesse View Post
    Which is funny 'cause, you know, the threat of nuclear annihilation is very much still there. I am uncomfortable about how close we apparently came to deploying nuclear weapons during the last administration. We're just not preparing kids for the realities of nuclear war anymore like we used to..
    I think that we could be pretty close to nuclear annihilation due to the Chinese threat over Taiwan. And I really see no compromise that could save the world from it.

  9. Top | #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by untermensche View Post
    Drive in movies were a great experience for a kid.

    For an adult probably not all that exciting.

    They were dead by the time I was an adult.

    Cable television and HBO and VCR's killed them.
    Ditto. Loved drive in movies when I was in high school. Wish that they'd come back...

  10. Top | #40
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    I hated when disco came around. I felt it was killing rock.
    I tend to think that disco damaged soul, more than it did rock. There just wasn't that much great rock after the 70s, but the best soul, my favorite genre, died out about the time that disco became popular. Rap and hip hop just can't compare to old school soul and funk.


    Still, I never hated disco because when it comes to dancing, there was nothing like "taking your body down to the ground". Disco was how we hooked up or met people to date. It was pretty much the equivalent of online dating, except at least you met the person before you dated. And, since I met my husband of nearly 40 years in a disco, I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for disco.

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