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Thread: What were the 70s and 80s like for you?

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    Elder Contributor Keith&Co.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    The Grateful Dead were touring all thought the 1980's except for part of 1986.
    But did they know that...?

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    Veteran Member crazyfingers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith&Co. View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    The Grateful Dead were touring all thought the 1980's except for part of 1986.
    But did they know that...?
    They have the tapes to prove it.

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    Elder Contributor Keith&Co.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith&Co. View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    The Grateful Dead were touring all thought the 1980's except for part of 1986.
    But did they know that...?
    They have the tapes to prove it.
    Pffft!
    Steven Tyler has heard an Aerosmith on the radio and told the band, "Great song, we should do a cover of it!"
    Joe Perry told him, "That's us, fuckhead."

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    Veteran Member crazyfingers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith&Co. View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post

    They have the tapes to prove it.
    Pffft!
    Steven Tyler has heard an Aerosmith on the radio and told the band, "Great song, we should do a cover of it!"
    Joe Perry told him, "That's us, fuckhead."
    Ok. I have the tapes to prove it... at least a lot

  5. Top | #15
    Elder Contributor Keith&Co.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Keith&Co. View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post

    They have the tapes to prove it.
    Pffft!
    Steven Tyler has heard an Aerosmith on the radio and told the band, "Great song, we should do a cover of it!"
    Joe Perry told him, "That's us, fuckhead."
    Ok. I have the tapes to prove it... at least a lot
    I didn't ask if it happened. I asked if they knew they were touring at the time?

  6. Top | #16
    Veteran Member crazyfingers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith&Co. View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyfingers View Post

    Ok. I have the tapes to prove it... at least a lot
    I didn't ask if it happened. I asked if they knew they were touring at the time?
    I think they remember. They are selling the downloads.. The ones who are left.

    Which reminds me, I went to a Dead and Company concert at Foxboro in 2019. It was just like what it used to be like. To bad the 2020 tour had to be canceled.

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    Veteran Member crazyfingers's Avatar
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    Crazy Fingers 1989


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    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
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    The '70s I was a little kid. There were bikes, a ladybird plague and drought, Abba, and far too much school.

    The '80s was the party before the end of the world. We all knew everyone would die at a few minutes notice at best, so we had fun.

    The '80s was also, by definition, the absolute last word in modernity. Everything was the pinnacle of technological advance, and would obviously never be bettered. We had walkmans, Elite for ZX Spectrum, filofaxes, and betamax. How anyone could ever imagine anything more advanced I do not know.

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    Veteran Member Ford's Avatar
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    Well at the dawn of the 70s I was four years old, and by the end of the 80s I was 25, so it kind of encompassed my "formative years" to put it mildly.

    Those early years is really just flashes of memory. Big events like the Apollo missions, watching Nixon resign, the evacuation of Saigon, and little things like our first house, my sister being brought home from the hospital, and lots of fishing trips with my dad.

    The late 70s were marked by things like going to the theater to see Jaws and Star Wars, along with the time my brother and I got that clock radio we could listen to at night in our bedroom. See, my dad graduated high school before Elvis debuted, and he did not hold with "that rock and roll music." We had a really nice stereo in the living room, but were basically not allowed to touch it let alone play records. So the clock radio was where I listened to the Beatles and the thing we both stared at when the "album rock" station first played Van Halen's "Eruption."

    (Side note...if you'd told me back then that just over 20 years later I'd be hanging out backstage with Van Halen I would have said "who are you and why are you in my bedroom?!")


    Anyway, the 80s. Reagan. High school. Dungeons and Dragons. The Cold War. It was a foregone conclusion at the time that a nuclear war was going to happen. It was only a question of when. You went on with your life with this sword of Damocles hanging over your head and the realization that all the stuff you were working on had a shelf-life of about 45 minutes if either side figured a "first strike" was the way to go. Graduated in '83, got accepted to my second choice college, went there and learned a lot. Like the fact that you could actually make a living as a radio DJ. A college station where I worked had this crazy idea that playing this new "rap" music alongside top 40 records would become a thing. My senior year was extended a bit due to a personal tragedy, but I also learned about some new tech on the horizon.

    High Definition television. This thing called the internet. "Wait...so you plug your computer into...the phone?" I also remember a professor in a film class insisting that "The Road Warrior" would become a seminal, influential work of art, and a history prof said (in 1987) "look, the world is about to change, and if you want my advice, you should go to business school and learn Russian." But Russia is still communist? "Trust me."

  10. Top | #20
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    The 70s were one of the worst decades of my life. I was married to my first husband in 1970, and two weeks after our son was born, his father was drafted. I had been an antiwar activist so I was horrified at the thought that my own husband might be a victim of that war. I agree with the others who said that the early 70s were a lot like the late 60s. There was a lot of unrest. There was the Nixon impeachment. There were those of us who blamed the older generations for everything that went wrong. ( That never changes, does it? )

    I agree that when Carter was elected, things did settle down a bit, although imo, this was the beginning of the Republicans blaming Carter and the Democrats for everything that went wrong. IN 72, I returned to school to study nursing so I was extremely stressed out and busy trying to raise a child, put up with an unloving spouse and engage myself in what turned out to be the most difficult thing I ever studied in my life. But, it was also a time when feminism was making a comeback. My nursing instructors were mostly fierce, independent women who taught us to be assertive and never back down to a physician, and to always question any authority. When I obtained my nursing degree, I finally felt like I had what it took to be an independent woman. I spent 1971-75 in San Antonio, Texas. The people I knew there were all into things like vegetarianism, and all kinds of newish health fads. Most of my friends were Baha'is, the religion of my spouse. They were more like left over 60s hippies and it was a refreshing change from my childhood religion.

    Rock and roll, soul and funky music were the best that they've ever been. We were very idealistic about the future of the world, once the war was over. Then I moved to Virginia so my husband could attend grad school while I started working as a nurse. Oh the horror of that first job. It was on the night shift, relentlessly stressful and never ending. I spent my breaks alone crying and wondering why I chose such a stressful career. After six months I left that job and found a much better one on 2nd shift. I still had hopes that my marriage would workout, as I was still very young and idealistic.

    In 77, we moved to South Carolina, which at the time was far more progressive than any southern state is currently. After another few months working in a horrible hospital, I found my first job in a public health department. I loved the work and my boss. I visited people in their homes, and saw unimaginable living conditions in both rural and urban areas. I saw extreme poverty, adult abuse, as well as some of the most loving people one could ever imagine. I still have both good and bad memories of some of those patients, including one who was abused by her family and another delightful one who lived in a low income housing project. I learned about ghetto life and had a patient who had lost an eye from gunfire during a gang fight right outside her door. All of those experiences impacted me, made me want to be more of an advocate for the poor, and the powerless. The public health department in SC, back in the 70s was amazing. The state was run by Democrats and we even had an environmental control department. So, if one of my patients had rats in her home, all I had to do was call that department and they would send someone to exterminate. The health department in Greenville, SC was probably the best run place that where I ever worked.

    By the end fo the 70s, my marriage had finally come to and end. Disco was hot and I started hanging out in discos looking for Mr. Right, while usually encountering men who were looking for Miss Right Now. As I was about to give up, I met my current husband in a disco, just before the end of 1979, so my worst decade came to an end.

    While I do enjoy my computer, life was simpler without so much technology and without having to be petrified of leaving home without your phone. We spent a lot of time enjoying nature and it seemed to me that people were far less materialistic during the 70s as compared to later decades.

    The 80s brought in Reagan and social programs and public health began to lose a lot of funding. People seemed to become more conservative and things that we had taken for granted, like Roe v. Wade, began to be under constant threat. There was the idiotic war on drugs and more divisiveness than what I remember during the 70s. The 80s brought in the era of greed, which has only gotten worse in more recent decades.

    I married in 1982 and moved to Raleigh, NC in 1983. I continued to work in public health on and off. I changed jobs frequently and considered leaving nursing quite often. Looking back, that was foolish. I was expecting the perfect boss and the perfect working conditions without realizing that such things rarely exist. Interest rates remained very high during much of the 80s, which was difficult for those of us who were still young, but great for my older patients who had money in CDs. We had a mortgage rate of over 13% at one time, which was refinanced to 9%. Can you imagine such a thing these days?

    I was always too busy and stressed out from work to think about much else. I was trying to raise my son. I envied his generation, as they were the first to have computers and they never had to deal with the constant fear of nuclear war as my generation did during most of our childhoods, or being drafted into the Viet Nam War. There were a few scares regarding world war, but nothing like what I remember growing up in the 50s and 60s. I didn't like much of the music of the 80s but did enjoy a lot of the movies of that decade, especially the comedic ones. My husband worked long hours and we were always both so tired that we ate most of our meals out.

    I think that the 80s was probably the decade when people started to eat out a lot. While we never did cocaine, it seemed as if everyone else did. Trivial pursuit was extremely popular, from what I remember. My husband had one job where the owners would send one of the night managers out to get some cocaine for them so they could all work through the night. No surprise that the company ended up bankrupt. The company made contact lenses and the joke was, "we lose money on every lens but we make it up in volume."

    My son finished high school in 1986 and went to a local community college in the Raleigh area, then later he received a BS in computer science. I finally felt free of the responsibility of raising a child. Some mothers feel sad when their child becomes an adult, it gave me a sense of accomplishment and freedom seeing my son become an independent adult with the potential to always be able to support himself.

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