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Thread: Watch NASA’s Perseverance Rover Land on Mars!

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    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
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    Watch NASA’s Perseverance Rover Land on Mars!

    Watch NASA’s Perseverance Rover Land on Mars!
    Feb. 18, 2021, 11:15 a.m. PST /2:15 p.m. EST


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    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
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    Update. Perseverance touched down. Waiting for pictures. Looking good.

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    I always get nervous watching these live. That was great though, and the first couple pictures are already amazing.

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    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Worldtraveller View Post
    I always get nervous watching these live. That was great though, and the first couple pictures are already amazing.
    That sky crane maneuver really amazes me. It seems that so much can go wrong if everything isn't functioning precisely after going through 10G deceleration. Looking forward to the helicopter tests. It's going to be like Kitty Hawk on Mars.

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    Content Thief Elixir's Avatar
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    Mind blowing...
    Funny how therapeutic it feels to see a human endeavor not designed for immediate power or profit, succeeding in real time.


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    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elixir View Post
    Mind blowing...
    Funny how therapeutic it feels to see a human endeavor not designed for immediate power or profit, succeeding in real time.
    ...
    That's why they chose the name Perseverance. For a very enlightening and inspiring documentary on her development check out the new PBS video, Built For Mars: The Perseverance Rover. Details the role of the technicians who made it possible. I worked as an electronics tech for many years and had a role in the preliminary manufacture of the Space Telescope primary and secondary mirrors. I've also had some clean room experience, so I'm inspired by the teamwork and mission dedication required for the development of cutting edge technology. I so wish I could have participated in something like this. Compared to what I experienced NASA seems to have it down to an art. Some of it comes down to a matter of luck. The Space Telescope demonstrated what happens when too much is left to luck.

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    Elder Contributor barbos's Avatar
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    I think it's safe to say NASA found a safe and reliable way to land on Mars.

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    Mazzie Daius fromderinside's Avatar
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    I don't think your statement is correct barbos. NASA has found a process through which whatever scenario whatever way) they construct to accomplish a task there are sufficient conditions NASA has developed in the system to assure that the next step will be accomplished within plan. That is systematically superior to 'found a reliable way. What they have done is develop a reliable system to make whatever design they settle upon lead to a successful conclusion. I've seen them pull off some pretty Rube Goldberg designs.

    Did you notice how many other sources of input they used to confirm what the rover was transmitting and or doing, for instance. I believe they had to incorporate a lot of very old technology in their design to accomplish that.

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    Elder Contributor barbos's Avatar
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    I don't think NASA have crashed anything on Mars in 20 years. And this is a second use of the same system - 2 out of 2.
    Yes, modern era starts with pathfinder in 97. That's 5 landings and all without failure.

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    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barbos View Post
    I don't think NASA have crashed anything on Mars in 20 years. And this is a second use of the same system - 2 out of 2.
    Yes, modern era starts with pathfinder in 97. That's 5 landings and all without failure.
    The bouncing ball airbag landing technique was ingenious but probably the only option available before they had the technology to make the sky crane work. The Perseverance Rover weighs 2,260 pounds. 100 times more than the Pathfinder's Sojourner rover. To get to where we can send people to Mars will require a much larger effort. Something like what we saw in the movie "The Martian". Hopefully NASA can maintain the current level of innovation and dedication as it evolves and expands. For the time being it seems they're keeping the dream alive.

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