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Thread: IBM Announces New Processor Breaktrhrough

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    Elder Contributor barbos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayjay View Post
    Not really a huge step. The "nanometers" have nothing to do with actual dimensions anymore (they used to, but semiconductor manufacturers started exaggerating their numbers until they became just a naming convention for each manufacturer's process generation)
    nanometers is usually related to the the smallest feature of the transistors, usually length of the gate. Transistors itself have different proportions for different manufacturers. Good metric is the density of the static memory.

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    Contributor Cheerful Charlie's Avatar
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    I am waiting for someone to invent an SDD technology that gives SSDs a longer useful lifespan. And to use better chip technology to create USB 3.1 flash drives that don't run hot as firecrackers. And better batteries for things like MP3 players that last about 2 years and crap out.
    Cheerful Charlie

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    Veteran Member Treedbear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheerful Charlie View Post
    I am waiting for someone to invent an SDD technology that gives SSDs a longer useful lifespan. ...
    Is that a big issue? SSD vs. HDD Noise, Power, and Lifespan -

    While it is true that SSDs wear out over time (each cell in a flash-memory bank can be written to and erased a limited number of times, measured by SSD makers as a "terabytes written" or TBW rating), thanks to TRIM command technology that dynamically optimizes these read/write cycles, you're more likely to discard the system for obsolescence before you start running into read/write errors with an SSD. If you're really worried, several tools can let you know if you're approaching the drive's rated end of life.

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    Quote Originally Posted by barbos View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayjay View Post
    Not really a huge step. The "nanometers" have nothing to do with actual dimensions anymore (they used to, but semiconductor manufacturers started exaggerating their numbers until they became just a naming convention for each manufacturer's process generation)
    nanometers is usually related to the the smallest feature of the transistors, usually length of the gate. Transistors itself have different proportions for different manufacturers. Good metric is the density of the static memory.
    The "nanometers" in the process node name these days don't refer to any feature size. It's just a marketing term. You are right that it used to refer to gate length, but that hasn't been the case since 28-32nm process nodes.

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    Elder Contributor barbos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayjay View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by barbos View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayjay View Post
    Not really a huge step. The "nanometers" have nothing to do with actual dimensions anymore (they used to, but semiconductor manufacturers started exaggerating their numbers until they became just a naming convention for each manufacturer's process generation)
    nanometers is usually related to the the smallest feature of the transistors, usually length of the gate. Transistors itself have different proportions for different manufacturers. Good metric is the density of the static memory.
    The "nanometers" in the process node name these days don't refer to any feature size. It's just a marketing term. You are right that it used to refer to gate length, but that hasn't been the case since 28-32nm process nodes.
    I am not saying that process nanometers directly equal to the length of the gate. Modern transistors are more complicated than in the past and you need more control over the process to make a relatively big (compared to process number) gate.
    Intel 10nm process have the same transistor density as TSMC 7nm process. But TSMC have finer gates which results in better performance in terms of speed and power consumption. Intel has always been known for high transistor density.
    They need to use transistor density for process description.

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