Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Who invented the hamburger?

  1. Top | #1
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Eugene, OR
    Posts
    15,569
    Archived
    16,829
    Total Posts
    32,398
    Rep Power
    95

    Who invented the hamburger?

    The hamburger’s origin story - The Washington Post
    "Who invented the hamburger? Biting into the messy history of America’s iconic sandwich."
    One popular story goes that in 1900 a customer walked into Louis’ Lunch in New Haven, Conn., and asked for something he could eat on the go. Owner Louis Lassen improvised by giving him a patty of the restaurant’s steak trimmings between two pieces of toast. The customer got his carryout lunch, and the world got the hamburger sandwich.
    Except that that was far from the first.
    In January I wrote a story that raised questions about Louis’ Lunch’s standing as the birthplace of the hamburger. However, I was not able to definitively disprove the claim. After the story ran, a reader named Thomas Pieragostini emailed me a link to a series of ads that appeared in the Shiner Gazette in Texas in the spring of 1894 that advertised “hamburger steak sandwiches” being served at a local saloon.
    noting
    Search Results « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

    This early burger reference inspired me to dig deeper, and I have since found more than a dozen newspaper references to hamburgers in the 1890s, including in Virginia, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, California and Hawaii. These findings debunk the Louis’ Lunch claim and suggest other burger origin stories are not true, either. ...
    Going back further,
    But the true precursor to the burger we know today seems to be an inexpensive dish called hamburger steak, which began appearing on American menus in the early 1870s. (A menu, allegedly from Delmonico’s in New York City in 1834, listed the dish. It was eventually exposed as a fake.)

    These minced beef and onion patties were served on a plate, not bread ...
    and
    In the mid-1700s, “The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy” by Hannah Glasse carried a “Hamburgh sausages” recipe, which was served on toasted bread. In Germany, a meat patty on bread called Rundstück Warm was popular by at least 1869.
    and
    “A first-century A.D. Roman cookbook by Apicius has a recipe in it that is suspiciously close to the modern burger, a minced meat patty blended with crushed nuts and heavily spiced and cooked,” says George Motz, a filmmaker and author who has researched burger history extensively.
    This is a kind of Sandwich That name comes from John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich someone who was known for liking to eat that combination food. But sandwiches are older than him.

  2. Top | #2
    Veteran Member Valjean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,342
    Archived
    3,176
    Total Posts
    4,518
    Rep Power
    44
    But did the Roman version have lettuce, tomato and special sauce, or a sesame seed bun?

  3. Top | #3
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Port Clinton, Ohio
    Posts
    4,465
    Archived
    591
    Total Posts
    5,056
    Rep Power
    73
    Fun fact, from Psych 101: Leon Festinger of cognitive dissonance theory developed the Impossible Whopper.

  4. Top | #4
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Eugene, OR
    Posts
    15,569
    Archived
    16,829
    Total Posts
    32,398
    Rep Power
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Valjean View Post
    But did the Roman version have lettuce, tomato and special sauce, or a sesame seed bun?
    Why not do some research?

  5. Top | #5
    Super Moderator Bronzeage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    7,207
    Archived
    7,568
    Total Posts
    14,775
    Rep Power
    47
    Probably the best any can do is find the first reference to the name hamburger, but like the sandwich, the concept of a sausage patty in a bun is pretty obvious to anyone who has a sausage patty and a bun.

  6. Top | #6
    Contributor Cheerful Charlie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    5,923
    Archived
    3,884
    Total Posts
    9,807
    Rep Power
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by Valjean View Post
    But did the Roman version have lettuce, tomato and special sauce, or a sesame seed bun?
    No, but it had garum, Roman fish sauce.
    Cheerful Charlie

  7. Top | #7
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    2,900
    Archived
    4,183
    Total Posts
    7,083
    Rep Power
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by lpetrich View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Valjean View Post
    But did the Roman version have lettuce, tomato and special sauce, or a sesame seed bun?
    Why not do some research?

  8. Top | #8
    Veteran Member TV and credit cards's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    muh-dahy-nuh
    Posts
    3,773
    Archived
    174
    Total Posts
    3,947
    Rep Power
    34
    For as long as there's been meat and bread at the table, I assure you men have been sandwiching them together.

  9. Top | #9
    Veteran Member Wiploc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    3,017
    Archived
    14,058
    Total Posts
    17,075
    Rep Power
    75
    When I was a youngster, I read a purported explanation in a newspaper:

    Ground beef became popular in Hamburg Germany. Sailors who liked it in Hamburg would order "Hamburg style" in other ports.

    Street vendors in New York sold little Hamburg steaks on buns, and thus the "hamburger" was born.
    How much of that do I remember and how much did I confabulate? I actually think I'm remembering what I read.

    But I cannot vouch for the accuracy of the article -- which I now remember was in a feature called "Junior Editors' Quiz" -- beyond this one bit: I have checked with Google Maps, and it turns out that Hamburg Germany is in fact accessible by water.

    Another Google search calls into question my spelling of "Junior Editors' Quiz." Different papers seem to have put the apostrophe in different places, if they included it at all.

    A search for "'Junior Editors' Quiz' hamburger" turns up a newspaper archive service that may have the original article behind a paywall.

  10. Top | #10
    Administrator lpetrich's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Eugene, OR
    Posts
    15,569
    Archived
    16,829
    Total Posts
    32,398
    Rep Power
    95
    I'm reluctant to read too much into being named after that city. Hotdogs are also called frankfurters and wieners, after another German city and an Austrian city.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •