Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: Who invented the hamburger?

  1. Top | #11
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    USA, California
    Posts
    4,006
    Archived
    5,710
    Total Posts
    9,716
    Rep Power
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by TV and credit cards View Post
    For as long as there's been meat and bread at the table, I assure you men have been sandwiching them together.
    Yeah, I suspect that putting a meat patty in some bread has been invented many, many times. Still, it is interesting to try to find out when the modern incarnation got started.

  2. Top | #12
    Contributor DrZoidberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Copenhagen
    Posts
    9,497
    Archived
    5,746
    Total Posts
    15,243
    Rep Power
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by Wiploc View Post
    When I was a youngster, I read a purported explanation in a newspaper:

    Ground beef became popular in Hamburg Germany. Sailors who liked it in Hamburg would order "Hamburg style" in other ports.

    Street vendors in New York sold little Hamburg steaks on buns, and thus the "hamburger" was born.
    How much of that do I remember and how much did I confabulate? I actually think I'm remembering what I read.

    But I cannot vouch for the accuracy of the article -- which I now remember was in a feature called "Junior Editors' Quiz" -- beyond this one bit: I have checked with Google Maps, and it turns out that Hamburg Germany is in fact accessible by water.

    Another Google search calls into question my spelling of "Junior Editors' Quiz." Different papers seem to have put the apostrophe in different places, if they included it at all.

    A search for "'Junior Editors' Quiz' hamburger" turns up a newspaper archive service that may have the original article behind a paywall.
    FYI, ground beef, traditionally is intended to make something expensive, beef, cheaper, by mixing it with other stuff. That's the story of fish balls/gefilte fish. Same story.

    "Popular" isn't quite the operative word here. They liked it because they could afford something which vaguely resembled something expensive.

  3. Top | #13
    Elder Contributor
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Located 100 miles east of A in America
    Posts
    31,858
    Archived
    42,473
    Total Posts
    74,331
    Rep Power
    100
    I need to look this up with my Alton Brown books. He's big into food history.
    Quote Originally Posted by lpetrich View Post
    I'm reluctant to read too much into being named after that city. Hotdogs are also called frankfurters and wieners, after another German city and an Austrian city.
    One claim I heard was it became Hot Dog because the guy popularizing them in the US didn't know how to spell Dachshund. Though, that doesn't make too much sense.

    I suppose another reason to go with Hot Dog is because "Insult to Sausage" wouldn't have sold well.

  4. Top | #14
    Loony Running The Asylum ZiprHead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Do you like my pretty crown?
    Posts
    25,311
    Archived
    3,034
    Total Posts
    28,345
    Rep Power
    100
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Higgins View Post
    I need to look this up with my Alton Brown books. He's big into food history.
    Quote Originally Posted by lpetrich View Post
    I'm reluctant to read too much into being named after that city. Hotdogs are also called frankfurters and wieners, after another German city and an Austrian city.
    One claim I heard was it became Hot Dog because the guy popularizing them in the US didn't know how to spell Dachshund. Though, that doesn't make too much sense.

    I suppose another reason to go with Hot Dog is because "Insult to Sausage" wouldn't have sold well.


    The world's greatest hot dog. The main ingredient in Flint style coney dogs.
    When conservatives realize they cannot win democratically, they will not abandon conservatism. They will abandon democracy.

    Poverty exists not because we cannot feed the poor but because we can't satisfy the rich.

  5. Top | #15
    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    The Sunshine State: The one with Crocs, not Gators
    Posts
    24,762
    Archived
    10,477
    Total Posts
    35,239
    Rep Power
    97
    The name certainly suggests a geographical origin. Northern German cities often give their names to locally produced food items; The Berliner, for example, is a kind of jam donut. A glance at a map reveals a fair number of urban centres that fit this pattern:


  6. Top | #16
    Veteran Member Wiploc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    3,017
    Archived
    14,058
    Total Posts
    17,075
    Rep Power
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    The name certainly suggests a geographical origin. Northern German cities often give their names to locally produced food items; The Berliner, for example, is a kind of jam donut. A glance at a map reveals a fair number of urban centres that fit this pattern:



  7. Top | #17
    Contributor DrZoidberg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Copenhagen
    Posts
    9,497
    Archived
    5,746
    Total Posts
    15,243
    Rep Power
    61
    In Europe food is often named for another city for no apartment reason other than to give it an air of exotism.

    Danish pastry in Denmark is called "Wienerbrød".

    There's many examples

  8. Top | #18
    Fair dinkum thinkum bilby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    The Sunshine State: The one with Crocs, not Gators
    Posts
    24,762
    Archived
    10,477
    Total Posts
    35,239
    Rep Power
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by DrZoidberg View Post
    In Europe food is often named for another city for no apartment reason other than to give it an air of exotism.

    Danish pastry in Denmark is called "Wienerbrød".

    There's many examples
    in Japan, too.


  9. Top | #19
    Veteran Member Wiploc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    3,017
    Archived
    14,058
    Total Posts
    17,075
    Rep Power
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrZoidberg View Post
    In Europe food is often named for another city for no apartment reason other than to give it an air of exotism.

    Danish pastry in Denmark is called "Wienerbrød".

    There's many examples
    in Japan, too.


    Philadelphia Cream Cheese

  10. Top | #20
    Contributor
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    5,103
    Archived
    4,797
    Total Posts
    9,900
    Rep Power
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by bilby View Post
    The name certainly suggests a geographical origin. Northern German cities often give their names to locally produced food items; The Berliner, for example, is a kind of jam donut. A glance at a map reveals a fair number of urban centres that fit this pattern:

    Dude, that map is an obvious fake. Everybody knows Bielefeld doesn't really exist.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •