Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 39 of 39

Thread: Today I saved the life of a helpless robin.

  1. Top | #31
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    3,012
    Archived
    4,183
    Total Posts
    7,195
    Rep Power
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by steve_bank View Post
    A dead bird is food for other creatures and decomposes back to nutrients retuned to the environment.

    Is it moral to damper with Mother Nature as if we are god?
    But humans are part of Mother Nature. So how are we tampering?

  2. Top | #32
    Formerly Joedad
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    PA USA
    Posts
    7,881
    Archived
    5,039
    Total Posts
    12,920
    Rep Power
    86
    Quote Originally Posted by thebeave View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by steve_bank View Post
    A dead bird is food for other creatures and decomposes back to nutrients retuned to the environment.

    Is it moral to damper with Mother Nature as if we are god?
    But humans are part of Mother Nature. So how are we tampering?
    Precisely.

  3. Top | #33
    Squadron Leader
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Land of Smiles
    Posts
    1,881
    Rep Power
    18
    My wife, a devout Buddhist, is intent on saving lives. We have five different varieties of lizard, umpteen varieties of bird (hoopoes, herons, crows, owls, sunbirds, starlings, mynahs, etc. etc), squirrels and more on our property. My wife has nurtured several injured birds back to health. Sometimes one ends up in our house and can't find the way out. We open doors and windows and gently shoo them out.

    The Hoopoe bird, which I'd never heard of until we wanted to figure out what we were seeing several years ago, is the Most Beautiful Bird in the world. We have an extended family of hoopoes living near our house now. In a corner of the roof, a tile is broken giving a little sanctuary — easy entrance to a place protected from rain — and that sanctuary has been the nest for several baby hoopoes over the years. We take care to keep trees and bushes pruned to deny snakes access to the hoopoe nest.

    There is a family of chickens living in our old (haunted?) orchard. My wife insists they are a different variety — they fly much better than ordinary chickens — but I'd have guessed them to be ordinary chickens who somehow fled from any of several neighbors who raise chicken. Occasionally a neighbor's cat comes to our property and is forced up a tree to escape from our dogs. Rescuing that cat becomes high priority.

    When she sees a poisonous scorpion, she doesn't kill it — she sweeps it into a bottle and escorts it back to the orchard. Mosquitoes and poisonous centipedes are about the only creatures we deliberately kill ourselves. (We also get poisonous snakes, but one of the primary duties of our dogs is to banish or kill snakes!) The last time we had a snake (Russell's viper! ) inside the house, I asked a neighbor for help. He caught the snake's head in a noose and escorted him alive to the old orchard. Buddhism forbids killing creatures. Monks don't even swat mosquitoes.

  4. Top | #34
    Contributor
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    seattle
    Posts
    7,510
    Rep Power
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by thebeave View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by steve_bank View Post
    A dead bird is food for other creatures and decomposes back to nutrients retuned to the environment.

    Is it moral to damper with Mother Nature as if we are god?
    But humans are part of Mother Nature. So how are we tampering?
    A manner of speaking, metaphor,, a witty saying....

  5. Top | #35
    Elder Contributor
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    24,504
    Archived
    16,553
    Total Posts
    41,057
    Rep Power
    84
    The human mind transcends "mother nature".

    It peeks under mother nature's clothing to see what is there.

    It knows about itself and mother nature. Mother nature knows nothing. Evolution is a blind process.

    Free will does not exist until brains evolve.

  6. Top | #36
    Contributor
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Burnsville, MN
    Posts
    6,593
    Archived
    2,911
    Total Posts
    9,504
    Rep Power
    52
    Quote Originally Posted by steve_bank View Post
    A dead bird is food for other creatures and decomposes back to nutrients retuned to the environment.

    Is it moral to damper with Mother Nature as if we are god?
    Yes, because to say otherwise is to proclaim "nature, just so" as god in the place of the god you claim you do not worship.

  7. Top | #37
    Elder Contributor
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    12,317
    Archived
    8,254
    Total Posts
    20,571
    Rep Power
    80
    Quote Originally Posted by Swammerdami View Post
    My wife, a devout Buddhist, is intent on saving lives. We have five different varieties of lizard, umpteen varieties of bird (hoopoes, herons, crows, owls, sunbirds, starlings, mynahs, etc. etc), squirrels and more on our property. My wife has nurtured several injured birds back to health. Sometimes one ends up in our house and can't find the way out. We open doors and windows and gently shoo them out.

    The Hoopoe bird, which I'd never heard of until we wanted to figure out what we were seeing several years ago, is the Most Beautiful Bird in the world. We have an extended family of hoopoes living near our house now. In a corner of the roof, a tile is broken giving a little sanctuary — easy entrance to a place protected from rain — and that sanctuary has been the nest for several baby hoopoes over the years. We take care to keep trees and bushes pruned to deny snakes access to the hoopoe nest.

    There is a family of chickens living in our old (haunted?) orchard. My wife insists they are a different variety — they fly much better than ordinary chickens — but I'd have guessed them to be ordinary chickens who somehow fled from any of several neighbors who raise chicken. Occasionally a neighbor's cat comes to our property and is forced up a tree to escape from our dogs. Rescuing that cat becomes high priority.

    When she sees a poisonous scorpion, she doesn't kill it — she sweeps it into a bottle and escorts it back to the orchard. Mosquitoes and poisonous centipedes are about the only creatures we deliberately kill ourselves. (We also get poisonous snakes, but one of the primary duties of our dogs is to banish or kill snakes!) The last time we had a snake (Russell's viper! ) inside the house, I asked a neighbor for help. He caught the snake's head in a noose and escorted him alive to the old orchard. Buddhism forbids killing creatures. Monks don't even swat mosquitoes.

  8. Top | #38
    Contributor
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Burnsville, MN
    Posts
    6,593
    Archived
    2,911
    Total Posts
    9,504
    Rep Power
    52
    I would like to think that the desire and willingness to help other creatures unbidden is a learnable one, and one that things understand the benefits to.

    If you save a bird today, maybe you have a friend for a long time. Or sometimes you get an annoying asshole who bothers you too much and takes up space under your eves or whatever. It's worth the risk to try making a friend.

    And as more people learn that, maybe we end up in a better world where we aren't at odds with our non-human neighbors. And with our human neighbors too, maybe?

    I kill when some creature makes it them or me. I don't often even step on ants. I don't let them in my house though. If the ants can guard their house, I can guard mine.

    Being kind to a bird is about being a friend to someone in need, plain and simple. If anyone wants to believe the bird should be left to die broken and alone, that's their business, but they best not tell me when I am deciding who to help, or to be there with, when the end is threatening.

  9. Top | #39
    Contributor
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Burnsville, MN
    Posts
    6,593
    Archived
    2,911
    Total Posts
    9,504
    Rep Power
    52
    So, I might as well contribute my own chapter of helping something helpless. But it's not as pure, sadly, as OP.

    For the last several weeks we have been dealing with cats on our porch. It's not a very clean porch, and there's a lot of junk there so it provides good shelter; it makes sense the occasional stray would find it and consider it the shelter of their dreams. Also the occasional bag of kitty litter that gets parked out there may also attract them?

    And thus is the tableau: one of these cats that occasionally appeared on my doorstep happened to be in the process of starving to death. She was also actively nursing.

    The thing is, neither I nor my husband like "feral" cats, not the cats themselves (who are generally quite kind and friendly), but rather the effect they have on the environment. So we were presented with a choice by cruel nature: save the mother by taking her in, at the expense of her kittens (who probably were starving as it is) and at the boon of the local wildlife; or leave her to starve, and those kittens to maybe survive but probably not.

    We chose to take her in.

    The first thing that we observed was that her whole situation seemed to be orbiting around her litter of kittens: it is fall, and it was probably her first litter, on her first heat. People tend to release cats because they don't think to spay them and because cats in heat like to escape and because cats in heat once they are pregnant are more expensive to spay and are carrying a package that will complicate the lives of the carers.

    But by whatever callousness and failure of responsibility, she is in my home, and she seems to be content to never leave it.

    I don't know if I would have, if not for this thread, made that decision. Probably? But possibly not

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •